Author Archives: Amy Hogan

PS – at the absolutely worst end of the scale is s…

PS - at the absolutely worst end of the scale is something I've encountered several times with my daughter this year (middle school) - a grade shows up in the portal, and she has to pester a teacher to even see the test afterward. So I ask her, "What did you miss?" or "Do you understand what you did wrong?" or "What do we need to review some more?" and she has ABSOLUTELY no clue. Yikes.

PS – at the absolutely worst end of the scale is s…

PS - at the absolutely worst end of the scale is something I've encountered several times with my daughter this year (middle school) - a grade shows up in the portal, and she has to pester a teacher to even see the test afterward. So I ask her, "What did you miss?" or "Do you understand what you did wrong?" or "What do we need to review some more?" and she has ABSOLUTELY no clue. Yikes.

I appreciate your attention to the evaluative feed…

I appreciate your attention to the evaluative feedback narrative... so often - in school and in life/work - when expectations are not met, or we get something "wrong", that's all we're told. I see this in supervision and leadership all the time. People miss the mark, and are given "constructive feedback" about the fact that they did something wrong, failed to meet expectations, but often aren't given the valuable insight into how this is judged. Often because supervisors and managers haven't ever given thought to clearly articulating how they make their judgments - going instead on "gut" reaction, or generalizations. But in school, work, or life, if we find out simply that we've done something "wrong" - we are left to our own devices on a trial-and-error quest for improvement... when having some clearer understanding of HOW we missed the mark, some direction on how to proceed or where to go next would be infinitely more productive. (and by the way, builds a more solid relationship as well)

I appreciate your attention to the evaluative feed…

I appreciate your attention to the evaluative feedback narrative... so often - in school and in life/work - when expectations are not met, or we get something "wrong", that's all we're told. I see this in supervision and leadership all the time. People miss the mark, and are given "constructive feedback" about the fact that they did something wrong, failed to meet expectations, but often aren't given the valuable insight into how this is judged. Often because supervisors and managers haven't ever given thought to clearly articulating how they make their judgments - going instead on "gut" reaction, or generalizations. But in school, work, or life, if we find out simply that we've done something "wrong" - we are left to our own devices on a trial-and-error quest for improvement... when having some clearer understanding of HOW we missed the mark, some direction on how to proceed or where to go next would be infinitely more productive. (and by the way, builds a more solid relationship as well)

Wow, this is so cool. What great ideas – and my m…

Wow, this is so cool. What great ideas - and my mind is spinning thinking of the linkages to other information systems we're struggling to get a handle on as a university right now... how a personalized degree/curriculum path could feed a student's ePortfolio, populate their CV/resume, load into systems to track research projects and publications. Link students with like interests, whose class-paths may or may not cross. Make suggestions about interdisciplinary collaborations... Beyond curriculum, could such a system recommend service opportunities, internships, student mentors...?? Awesomeness.

Wow, this is so cool. What great ideas – and my m…

Wow, this is so cool. What great ideas - and my mind is spinning thinking of the linkages to other information systems we're struggling to get a handle on as a university right now... how a personalized degree/curriculum path could feed a student's ePortfolio, populate their CV/resume, load into systems to track research projects and publications. Link students with like interests, whose class-paths may or may not cross. Make suggestions about interdisciplinary collaborations... Beyond curriculum, could such a system recommend service opportunities, internships, student mentors...?? Awesomeness.

Amen, brother, amen!! I'm having a similar ex…

Amen, brother, amen!!

I'm having a similar experience with the "text" - but reading your post gave me some new insights as well...

First of all - when we were discussing McLuhan we talked about a society being limited by what they know and experience, in the context of challenges in just plopping new technology into it... but it strikes me in a new way that the opposite is true too... Our experience and expectations that are shaped by technology not only challenge us in moving forward, but also in moving "backward". As you are, I prefer to read on the go - when it's convenient and I'm able to, and in a way in which I can pull more information into it. Going "back" to static text is often cumbersome. Interesting.

Secondly - I think some technologies/platforms have started moving toward the built-in interactivity you're talking about toward the end. But you highlight some amazing remaining opportunity. You know those webpages (not all, I'm not sure how or which ones are programmed for it?) that highlight some words or concepts as links? And in e-readers, many have a built-in dictionary that allows you to look up any word... and you can see what others have highlighted, and with what frequency... WHAT IF you could right-click on any word or selected phrase in electronic media and get a pop-up menu with options like "look up," "search related concepts," "search related media," "find related quotes," "find related commentary"... Hmm, that could be really cool.

Amen, brother, amen!! I'm having a similar ex…

Amen, brother, amen!!

I'm having a similar experience with the "text" - but reading your post gave me some new insights as well...

First of all - when we were discussing McLuhan we talked about a society being limited by what they know and experience, in the context of challenges in just plopping new technology into it... but it strikes me in a new way that the opposite is true too... Our experience and expectations that are shaped by technology not only challenge us in moving forward, but also in moving "backward". As you are, I prefer to read on the go - when it's convenient and I'm able to, and in a way in which I can pull more information into it. Going "back" to static text is often cumbersome. Interesting.

Secondly - I think some technologies/platforms have started moving toward the built-in interactivity you're talking about toward the end. But you highlight some amazing remaining opportunity. You know those webpages (not all, I'm not sure how or which ones are programmed for it?) that highlight some words or concepts as links? And in e-readers, many have a built-in dictionary that allows you to look up any word... and you can see what others have highlighted, and with what frequency... WHAT IF you could right-click on any word or selected phrase in electronic media and get a pop-up menu with options like "look up," "search related concepts," "search related media," "find related quotes," "find related commentary"... Hmm, that could be really cool.

Comment on Intuition: Use, Agency, Invitation by Amy Hogan

My definition of “intuition”: the sense of knowing (though maybe not being able to describe why or how…) that something is, or what will be. I had not thought before about this extending to the sense of “what could be”, but I think that it does. A hard-to-articulate combination of imagination and dreaming, and a sense of the world – combined in a way that brings out the best of both and makes newness a reality.

First of all – BRILLIANT! What a powerful analogy…

First of all - BRILLIANT! What a powerful analogy you're exploring, with seemingly endless parallels..

Secondively,
"YES! Will it be messy? Absolutely! I argue that it is through these failed conceptions, misprints, and design changes that we learn the most about how the thing works, and where we gain the most power over our designs."

I had a similar reaction and thoughts at several points in reading Ted Nelson... he seems beyond frustrated with the paradigm-limited attempts to leverage technology to perpetuate broken systems (rightly so), but also shows no patience or appreciation for mistakes along the way. In fact, at one point he seemed disdainful toward those not making light-speed strides into a new dimension. Indeed, it is early mistake-fraught attempts into new arenas that I think help us understand needed changes in direction and approach, build awareness and a new level of understanding of the needs and opportunities, and set the stage for true advancement. And, by the way, the mistakes don't just inform the process and systems advancement - they inform our learning about our own learning and awareness. Powerfully valuable.