Monthly Archives: April 2013

Interesting post. However, I disagree with the ide…

Interesting post. However, I disagree with the idea that grading is negative for the student learning process. My own experience as an instructor has shown me otherwise.

First, BLUE or RED marks on the paper are meant to serve two purposes. One is to allow the student to identify his or her weaknesses and correct them. The second is to allow the student to have a comparative idea of his/her performance in relation to everyone else in class.

Second, I have never seen grades diminishing a student. Those who get high grades are proud of their work. Those who get low grades must now worry about doing better next time or risk failing the course.

There are various other arguments to support the use of grades (RED and BLUE marks) but for the sake of space, perhaps it can be discussed elsewhere. However, I must say that using a RED Pen reflects very much what you will experience in real life. You will be constantly evaluated in everything you do. You will have to take standardized tests (which will not go away), you will submit your work to be reviewed and criticized by peers, and you will be selected to positions of power and knowledge based on your performance rank.

Thanks for your article. I am sure you will appreciate an opposing view. Hopefully others will comment as well.

Paulo Castro | www.fullminddesign.com

By the way, you can check out my new blog at blog1.fullminddesign.com

Interesting post. However, I disagree with the ide…

Interesting post. However, I disagree with the idea that grading is negative for the student learning process. My own experience as an instructor has shown me otherwise.

First, BLUE or RED marks on the paper are meant to serve two purposes. One is to allow the student to identify his or her weaknesses and correct them. The second is to allow the student to have a comparative idea of his/her performance in relation to everyone else in class.

Second, I have never seen grades diminishing a student. Those who get high grades are proud of their work. Those who get low grades must now worry about doing better next time or risk failing the course.

There are various other arguments to support the use of grades (RED and BLUE marks) but for the sake of space, perhaps it can be discussed elsewhere. However, I must say that using a RED Pen reflects very much what you will experience in real life. You will be constantly evaluated in everything you do. You will have to take standardized tests (which will not go away), you will submit your work to be reviewed and criticized by peers, and you will be selected to positions of power and knowledge based on your performance rank.

Thanks for your article. I am sure you will appreciate an opposing view. Hopefully others will comment as well.

Paulo Castro | www.fullminddesign.com

By the way, you can check out my new blog at blog1.fullminddesign.com

The Drama of Human-Technology Interaction

Imagine you are sitting at your computer (which you are) and are about to complete a task such as such writing an email to a friend or analyzing some data using a spreadsheet. Such tasks would seem rather routine, but through the eyes of Brenda Laurel, they might be conceived as subplots in the drama of life. In “The Six Elements and the Causal Relations Among Them” and “Dramatic Interaction in a Small World,” Laurel considers how human-technology interactions could be conceived in theatrical terms. By using Aristotle’s sixth elements of structure in drama (below), Laurel takes us on a thought exercise in how drama can be used to describe the elements of human-computer interaction. While I have yet to be convinced of the inherent value of the framework, the notion that our interaction with technology can be thought of as an “organic whole” – where “form and structure can approach that of natural organisms in the way the parts fit perfectly together” (p. 570) – does provide a vision for a perfect human-technology symbiosis.

Untitled

Source: Brenda Laurel (2003) “The Six Elements and the Causal Relations Among Them.” In The New Media Reader, MIT Press, p. 565.

If my interaction with a computer can be thought of in a theatrical way, my question is who is writing the script? I’d like to think that I control the script and that the computer enables my acting by perfectly responding to, perhaps anticipating, my every move in a free flowing form of interaction. At some level this is true. For example, my computer just told me that I misspelt “ineraction.” However, it is also true that my interaction with a computer is constrained by the limitations of the computer and its programs. This makes me wonder whether the very structure of a computer platform will dictate, at a meta-level, the scope of the script and the drama that unfolds. One is reminded of “the architect” in the Matrix and whether the writers of that script were on to something.


Comment on by Gardner Campbell

Fascinating! I do wish “blogs about them” were linked to his blog. Good to keep the *good* Google juice circulating. :) Also, I can’t find his blog very easily with a straightforward search. I’ll keep trying. I owe it to opera, documentation, bib overalls, and the aurora.

P.S. You have a way with images. Been meaning to compliment you on your header. Kubrick would be pleased, I think.

Amen, brother, amen!! I'm having a similar ex…

Amen, brother, amen!!

I'm having a similar experience with the "text" - but reading your post gave me some new insights as well...

First of all - when we were discussing McLuhan we talked about a society being limited by what they know and experience, in the context of challenges in just plopping new technology into it... but it strikes me in a new way that the opposite is true too... Our experience and expectations that are shaped by technology not only challenge us in moving forward, but also in moving "backward". As you are, I prefer to read on the go - when it's convenient and I'm able to, and in a way in which I can pull more information into it. Going "back" to static text is often cumbersome. Interesting.

Secondly - I think some technologies/platforms have started moving toward the built-in interactivity you're talking about toward the end. But you highlight some amazing remaining opportunity. You know those webpages (not all, I'm not sure how or which ones are programmed for it?) that highlight some words or concepts as links? And in e-readers, many have a built-in dictionary that allows you to look up any word... and you can see what others have highlighted, and with what frequency... WHAT IF you could right-click on any word or selected phrase in electronic media and get a pop-up menu with options like "look up," "search related concepts," "search related media," "find related quotes," "find related commentary"... Hmm, that could be really cool.

Amen, brother, amen!! I'm having a similar ex…

Amen, brother, amen!!

I'm having a similar experience with the "text" - but reading your post gave me some new insights as well...

First of all - when we were discussing McLuhan we talked about a society being limited by what they know and experience, in the context of challenges in just plopping new technology into it... but it strikes me in a new way that the opposite is true too... Our experience and expectations that are shaped by technology not only challenge us in moving forward, but also in moving "backward". As you are, I prefer to read on the go - when it's convenient and I'm able to, and in a way in which I can pull more information into it. Going "back" to static text is often cumbersome. Interesting.

Secondly - I think some technologies/platforms have started moving toward the built-in interactivity you're talking about toward the end. But you highlight some amazing remaining opportunity. You know those webpages (not all, I'm not sure how or which ones are programmed for it?) that highlight some words or concepts as links? And in e-readers, many have a built-in dictionary that allows you to look up any word... and you can see what others have highlighted, and with what frequency... WHAT IF you could right-click on any word or selected phrase in electronic media and get a pop-up menu with options like "look up," "search related concepts," "search related media," "find related quotes," "find related commentary"... Hmm, that could be really cool.