Monthly Archives: April 2013

PS – at the absolutely worst end of the scale is s…

PS - at the absolutely worst end of the scale is something I've encountered several times with my daughter this year (middle school) - a grade shows up in the portal, and she has to pester a teacher to even see the test afterward. So I ask her, "What did you miss?" or "Do you understand what you did wrong?" or "What do we need to review some more?" and she has ABSOLUTELY no clue. Yikes.

PS – at the absolutely worst end of the scale is s…

PS - at the absolutely worst end of the scale is something I've encountered several times with my daughter this year (middle school) - a grade shows up in the portal, and she has to pester a teacher to even see the test afterward. So I ask her, "What did you miss?" or "Do you understand what you did wrong?" or "What do we need to review some more?" and she has ABSOLUTELY no clue. Yikes.

I appreciate your attention to the evaluative feed…

I appreciate your attention to the evaluative feedback narrative... so often - in school and in life/work - when expectations are not met, or we get something "wrong", that's all we're told. I see this in supervision and leadership all the time. People miss the mark, and are given "constructive feedback" about the fact that they did something wrong, failed to meet expectations, but often aren't given the valuable insight into how this is judged. Often because supervisors and managers haven't ever given thought to clearly articulating how they make their judgments - going instead on "gut" reaction, or generalizations. But in school, work, or life, if we find out simply that we've done something "wrong" - we are left to our own devices on a trial-and-error quest for improvement... when having some clearer understanding of HOW we missed the mark, some direction on how to proceed or where to go next would be infinitely more productive. (and by the way, builds a more solid relationship as well)

I appreciate your attention to the evaluative feed…

I appreciate your attention to the evaluative feedback narrative... so often - in school and in life/work - when expectations are not met, or we get something "wrong", that's all we're told. I see this in supervision and leadership all the time. People miss the mark, and are given "constructive feedback" about the fact that they did something wrong, failed to meet expectations, but often aren't given the valuable insight into how this is judged. Often because supervisors and managers haven't ever given thought to clearly articulating how they make their judgments - going instead on "gut" reaction, or generalizations. But in school, work, or life, if we find out simply that we've done something "wrong" - we are left to our own devices on a trial-and-error quest for improvement... when having some clearer understanding of HOW we missed the mark, some direction on how to proceed or where to go next would be infinitely more productive. (and by the way, builds a more solid relationship as well)

Wow, this is so cool. What great ideas – and my m…

Wow, this is so cool. What great ideas - and my mind is spinning thinking of the linkages to other information systems we're struggling to get a handle on as a university right now... how a personalized degree/curriculum path could feed a student's ePortfolio, populate their CV/resume, load into systems to track research projects and publications. Link students with like interests, whose class-paths may or may not cross. Make suggestions about interdisciplinary collaborations... Beyond curriculum, could such a system recommend service opportunities, internships, student mentors...?? Awesomeness.

Wow, this is so cool. What great ideas – and my m…

Wow, this is so cool. What great ideas - and my mind is spinning thinking of the linkages to other information systems we're struggling to get a handle on as a university right now... how a personalized degree/curriculum path could feed a student's ePortfolio, populate their CV/resume, load into systems to track research projects and publications. Link students with like interests, whose class-paths may or may not cross. Make suggestions about interdisciplinary collaborations... Beyond curriculum, could such a system recommend service opportunities, internships, student mentors...?? Awesomeness.

I'm concerned that a single question is being …

I'm concerned that a single question is being used here to evaluate so many criteria at once. Perhaps a simpler, more modular set of exercises could build up understanding to a mastery level on individual points. How about something like this: http://slidespeech.com/s/s4vBG7Ymen/?autoplay=true

I'm concerned that a single question is being …

I'm concerned that a single question is being used here to evaluate so many criteria at once. Perhaps a simpler, more modular set of exercises could build up understanding to a mastery level on individual points. How about something like this: http://slidespeech.com/s/s4vBG7Ymen/?autoplay=true

Comment on Perfect Mirrors by alrobins

Kimberley, as soon as I saw the title of your post, I was thinking about mirror neurons too! What an interesting question…I love the idea of real life communication, but maybe these simulated realities can help those who struggle with conventional social interaction. Or maybe it just enables them to continue to avoid it…