Grad Student Mental Health

I saw this blog posted on a friend’s Facebook page, and thought I would share it http://www.nashturley.org/2013/09/02/acknowledging-and-addressing-mental-health-issues-among-graduate-students/

Also, some mental illness facts Fact Sheet

I think it addresses a lot of the issues related to mental health in graduate students and how it is important to have a frank discussion about it. There is still to much fear related to mental illness and what it means. And just because you may not be “as bad” as somebody else doesn’t mean you don’t have the right to seek help. Questions to ask yourself: Do you know what mental health services are available to grads? Could you speak with somebody in your department about seeking counseling or therapy without judgment?

Category(s): gedivtf13

6 Responses to Grad Student Mental Health

  1. Mental health is a very important topic. It is important to help people change their schema associated with mental health.

  2. I think your friend makes many good points. I believe that, as he stated, denial and being ashamed of mental health issues because of stigma add to students themselves not getting help.
    There are many options out there for help. Here at VT I notice that there is a sunrise yoga everyday at WAR (yes if you sign up and pay for classes, but at a small fee) which I may start to take advantage of, with a 70% decrease in depression and 20% decrease in anxiety for once a week yoga!! Awesome! In the end I think we have to get over our belief that mental health issues are for the weak. We can be happier people in general by being more mentally healthy, and in the end, isn’t happiness what we are all after in this journey of life?

    Marjorie Willner says:

    I saw that too. I concurred with the conclusions that it should be a larger part of the discussion. However, I’m sure some people will wave their hands and think we have a charmed life once reading this.

  3. Thanks for the great post. The state of personal mental health seems mostly ignored, and its importance seems underrated. I was talking to a university official recently who (only half jokingly) said she thought counseling should be mandatory for everyone. From my own experience, and that of a few close friends, I would support the idea of everyone being counseled in some capacity.

      clinicmatters says:

      Great point. I believe soldiers are required to have “transition” counseling after coming back from combat zones. Even just a few minutes talking with somebody can make a difference. Sure, you will have those who blow it off, but at least the service is there.

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