Final, Finite Frontiers

G. Val'k: The Signs of Difference (1969) These unisex long-haired hipsters caused as much consternation among Soviet adults as among their Western counterparts. Source: I. P. Abramskii: Vragi i druz'ia v zerkale Krokodila, 1922-1972. Moscow: Pravda. 19

G. Val’k: The Signs of Difference (1969) These unisex long-haired hipsters caused as much consternation among Soviet adults as among their Western counterparts.
Source: I. P. Abramskii: Vragi i druz’ia v zerkale Krokodila, 1922-1972. Moscow: Pravda. 19

This week was all about pushing boundaries — whether in outer space, on the border with China, atop the Bratsk high dam, at the edge of tillable land, or in the tense encounter between an artist and the Soviet leader. Taken as a whole, the posts bear testament to the contradictions and richness of the Khrushchev era — with equal attention paid to a long-covered up massacre and to the highly public and publicized deterioration of the relationship between the Soviet Union and The People’s Republic of China.

Among the chroniclers of the Soviet space program is an author who was photographed with Valentina Tereshkova — the first woman in space.  So even if you are only dropping by the site, please don’t leave without checking out To Infinity and Then a Rough Trip Home.

The weekly digest will be on hiatus until November 17, while we sort out mid-terms and clean house.  Until then, enjoy the Soviet sixties!

Image source: http://soviethistory.macalester.edu/index.php?page=subject&show=images&SubjectID=1968generation&Year=1968&navi=byYear

A. Nelson

I am a historian of Russia with expertise in cultural history and emerging interests in animal studies and environmental history. My current research projects include studies of the Soviet space dogs, the significance of the Belyaev fox domestication project, and the cultural implications of domestication, particularly in Eurasia.

 

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