Author Archives: annadean

Young, Wild, and Free

Throughout the course many of us have talked about gender roles, particularly about abortion laws and gender norms. When Stalin’s regime ended, it seemed that women’s rights took a 180 turn on several issues. The government especially started focusing on … Continue reading

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No More Church Bells

Continuing my theme of religion, this week on the 17 moments page I found an interesting topic about Khrushchev and his role in the (further) destruction of the church. The church was already losing power (Stalin was afraid of the … Continue reading

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“Happiness of Motherhood”

Last week, I read a post about gender roles and it talked about how Stalin made abortion illegal because of the negative impact he thought it would have on the population. When I was looking at the events of 1956, … Continue reading

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Silence has Fallen

Before 1929, the churches of Russia were already facing harsh penalties under the new government. Afraid of the churches power, the Bolsheviks blamed the churches for the famine. The Criminal Code of 1923 placed harsh restrictions and penalties on the … Continue reading

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Church of Gold

“What can the church of gold give us? Russia could be fed this year and the next!” Source: Hoover Political Poster Database. 2007. With all of the cultural changes happening during the early 1900’s, I found the changing of religion … Continue reading

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Bloody Sunday

In January 1905, men, women, and children, marched on the Tsar’s Winter Palahttps://aposplendourseries.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/bloody_sunday.jpgce. However, the Tsar was not there and the march ended in the military shooting into the unarmed protesters, killing over a hundred unarmed people (Freeze 250-251). Out … Continue reading

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Zlatoust Factories

This picture interested me because of the juxtaposition of the church and the factory next to it. To me, it symbolized the move from a non-secular state to a more secular state. As George Freeze mentioned, the late 1800’s was … Continue reading

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About

Welcome to┬ámy blog! This blog is a part of my 20th Century Russian Class here at Virginia Tech. You can find a link to our class page here as well as on the right side of the page under “Soviet … Continue reading

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