How will we build a Third System of education?

I have recently been reading about, as Mike Gancarz puts it in Linux and the Unix Philosophy, “The Three Systems of Man”. This is, to my understanding, a fairly well documented and often-observed concept in software design, possibly first referenced by Frederick Brooks in The Mythical Man-Month when he coined “the second system effect“. Gancarz seems to take the concept further, generalizing it to any system built by humans.

Man has the capacity to build only three systems. No mater how hard he may try, no matter how many hours, months, or years for which he may struggle, he eventually realizes that he is incapable of anything more. He simply cannot build a fourth. To believe otherwise is self-delusion.

The First System

Fueled by need, constricted by deadlines, a first system is born out of a creative spark. It’s quick, often dirty, but gets the job done well. Importantly it inspires others with the possibilities it opens up. The “what if”s elicited by a First System lead to…

The Second System

Encouraged and inspired by the success of the First System more people want to get on bored and offer their own contributions and add features they deem necessary. Committees are formed to organize and delegate. Everyone offers their expertise and everyone believes they have expertise, even when they don’t. The Second System has a marketing team devoted to selling its many features to eagerly awaiting customers, and to appeal to the widest possible customer base nearly any feature that is thought up is added. In reality, most users end up only using a small fraction of available features of The Second System, the rest just get in the way. Despite enjoying commercial success The Second System is usually the worse of the three. By trying to appease everyone (and more often then not, by not understanding , the committees in charge have created a mediocre experience. The unnecessary features add so much complexity that bugs are many and fixes take a considerable amount of effort. After some time, some users (and developers) start to recognize The Second System for what it is: bloatware.

The Third System

The Third System is built by people who have been burned by the Second System

Eventually enough people grow frustrated by the inefficiencies and bloat of The Second System that they rebel against it. They set out to create a new system that contains the essential features and lessons learned in the First and Second Systems, but leave out the crud that accumulated by the Second System. The construction of a Third System comes about either as a result of observed need, or as an act of rebellion against the Second System. Third Systems challenge the status quo set by Second Systems, and as such there is a natural tendency to those invested in The Second System to criticize, distrust and fear The Third System and those who advocate for it.

The Interesting History of Unix

Progression from First to Second to Third system always happens in that order, but sometimes a Third System can reset back to First, as is the case with Unix. While Gancarz argues that current commercial Unix is a Second System, the original Unix created by a handful of people at Bell Labs was a Third System. It grew out of the Multics project which was the Second System solution spun from the excitement of the Compatible Time-Sharing System (CTSS), arguably the first timesharing system ever deployed. Multics suffered so much from second-system syndrome that it collapsed under its own weight.

Linux is both a Third and Second system: while it shares many properties of commercial Unix that are Second System-like, it is under active development by people who came aboard as rebels of Unix and who put every effort into eliminating the Second System cruft associated with its commercial cousin.

Is our current Educational Complex a Second System?

I see many signs of second-system effect in our current educational system. Designed and controlled by committee, constructed to meed the needs of a large audience while failing to meet the individual needs of many (most?). Solutions to visible problems are also determined by committee and patches to solutions serve to cover up symptoms. Addressing the underlying causes would require asking some very difficult questions about the nature of the system itself. Something that those invested in it are not rushing to do.

Building a Third System

What would a Linux-esq approach to education look like? What are the bits that we would like to keep? What are the ugliest pieces that should be discarded first? And how will we weave it all together into a functional, useful system?