Looking at the story from a different point of view…or…. a useful Model!

While reading the  New Culture of Learning I really enjoyed the story of Teaching in a galaxy far, far away. A year ago, I was enrolled in a course called Motivation and Education offered by the Educational Psychology department. Dr. Brett Jones, the instructor of this course, developed a model called the MUSIC Model of  Motivation. This model is designed to make the current motivation research and theories applicable to teachers and educators. Based on this model, there are five factors that contribute to students’ motivation in a learning environment.  These factors are eMpowerment, Usefulness, Success, Interest, and Caring. According to Dr. Jones, students’ will be motivated to learn if they perceive that:

  1. They are eMpowered. In other words, if they perceive that they have autonomy and control over their learning experience.
  2. The material is Useful to them.
  3. They can Succeed in meeting the objectives.
  4. The material is Interesting to them.
  5. They perceive a sense of Caring from the all the members of the community (teacher and peers)

Incorporate these factors into your course design or any learning experience and your students will be motivated and eager to get engaged and learn. Looking at the story of Teaching in a galaxy far, far away through the glasses of the MUSIC model, the main two factors that made the students incredibly engaged and made the course a very fun experience for them are the U and I of the model, Usefulness and Interest. The design of the course was in a way to make the material relevant and interesting to the students. Also, allowing the students to decide about the order and the timing of the tasks and activities of each session probably gave them a sense of eMpowerment.

 

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4 Responses to Looking at the story from a different point of view…or…. a useful Model!

  1. Amy Hermundstad Nave

    I really enjoyed reading your post! And I really appreciate that you tied in the MUSIC model of motivation to the examples that were provided in the New Culture of Learning. I think your post brings up a really important point that when talking about things like incorporating technology into classrooms and engaging digital learners, we should think about how different tools and approaches can be implemented to benefit our students. I really appreciated how you examined the examples provided and discussed how the specific learning experience made the topic more interesting and useful for the students as well as empowered the students. Thanks for the post!

  2. I enjoyed this also! The Music model resonates nicely with Dan Pink’s studies on intrinsic motivation (which we’ll be talking about either this week or next).

  3. Romcholo Macatula

    The discussion of motivation is such a critical component in learning. I truly believe that you excel in things that you are engaged with. A big question teachers face is “How do I make my classes engaging?” We can get a head start on answering this question if we think about what contributes to the student’s motivation to engage with the lecture. I am a big fan of frameworks like these (and having an interesting mnemonic is a great plus)

    As teachers I think we should take particular focus on the last component, Caring. We can have a direct impact on student performance by being caring. Isn’t it novel to think that you can improve the effectiveness of your lecture by just being suportive?

    With the model you mentioned, we should look at what components are easy to control and which components we have less control over, as students. We should recognize we can make a huge impact on a student’s motivation.

  4. jschlittepi

    That’s a pretty cool approach to try to satisfy learner’s needs! I’m curious if they had their minds set on the acronym character before they fleshed it out. Still, I remember most of my classmates’ complaints against a course over time having to do with a failure to address one of these goals.

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