• Authority vs. Authoritarian Teaching

    Posted on October 13th, 2019 sbbaron 2 comments

    An authority teacher is someone who is the face of the classroom, participates in the learning, moderates conflict, and enhances discussions. On the other hand an authoritarian professor controls the classroom, doesn’t allow for free thought, and reigns over the students and inhibit and are not a part of the learning process. 

    (Holland, 2018)

    Before this class I had never thought about the difference between an authority and authoritarian teacher but I have definitely had both. The authoritarian teachers I’ve had usually liked to hear themself talk, disagreed with proposed changes, and felt they were the expert on everything discussed in the class even if a student had first hand experience with a topic. The authority teachers I’ve had usually also end up being my favorite classes. These teachers make the class feel that we have knowledge to share and usually outright admit that they may be the “expert” but that they are not all knowing. I feel with the authority style of teaching the teachers learn almost as much as the students while the authoritarian style the professor has adopted more of aa “I know everything already” state of mind.

     

     

     

    Holland, M. (2018, November 30). Do You Have Legitimate Authority? – Michael Holland. Retrieved October 13, 2019, from https://www.bishophouse.com/executives-should-know/do-you-have-legitimate-authority/.

     

     

     

    2 responses to “Authority vs. Authoritarian Teaching” RSS icon

    • Sarah,
      You did a great post, and I share your preferences’’ teaching style and classroom. In an authority style of teaching, I think that teachers and students share the focus and interact equally while the teacher still maintains authority. This can be beneficial to students because group work is encouraged; thus, communication and collaboration are used and encouraged. However, due to the fact that students are talking, classrooms may be noisier and may be more difficult to manage

    • Nice post, Sarah! Your distinction of the authority and authoritarian teacher is clearly defined. I do agree with you on that and expressed same in my post of this week. The teacher with authority is open to criticism and co-shares the learning process with students, whereas the authoritarian presents him/herself/themselves as “know it all.” The sad aspect of this is that the authoritarian does more harm than good; that person doesn’t realize that students are humans as well and have prior knowledge based on their experience and origin which could be contributive to the learning process. Also, that person doesn’t give room for flexibility; by this I mean alternatives- relative and multiplicity view to the learning process in terms of approach/instruction/believes. Thanks!


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