Week 2 Post – Growth Mindset with blogging

My two biggest takeaways from this weeks readings/viewings are:

  • Blogs can be used as part of academic documents (thesis, articles and books) – I had no idea and this is brilliant new information for me
  • the Baby George video by Michael Wesch reinforces a philosophy I learned last year – Growth Mindset by Carol Dwerk.  I love this “not yet” idea and have even shared it with some students, who also loved it.

 

10 Replies to “Week 2 Post – Growth Mindset with blogging”

  1. Not yet mindset certainly sounds very good in idealistic world, but at what point should one say — “I don’t think this is your cup of tea”. Industry is extremely unforgiving and the smallest of mistakes can end up in ones termination, so if “not yet” mindset is being taught to students, are we actually doing justice to them ? I think we should be teaching them “this is it, you have one shot” mindset.

    1. Hi Vlbhav – you have a good point. I come at this with a strong bias. I had two high school math teachers tell me I’d never be an engineer – basically they said it wasn’t my cup of tea. Now I’m a professor of engineering. Can we ever really know what a student is capable of if they are determined? I, personally, would never condone telling a student, “this is your one shot” because that is never really true. I think a conversation can be had about what are your true passions, what are you good at, find where they intersect, all without telling them, directly, that they shouldn’t pursue a certain path. Thanks for your comment!

      1. Hi,

        I get that some professionals ( I’m thinking doctors and air traffic controllers) perform in work environments where the price of making mistakes is high. But I don’t think that is generalizable to all professions. And more, I’m not sure the best way to train such professionals somehow does not include giving the students the chance to learn from their mistakes. On a broader level, trial and error is the foundation of many sciences.

        1. Yes Aransh,
          No one theory applies to everyone or every job. Also, I agree about trial and error being important. It is the basis of the growth mindset’s “not yet” and baby George’s wonderful efforts of learning how to walk down stairs.

      2. I completely agree with you that we should not be discouraging students and telling them that “this is not your cup of tea”, especially because academia is their time to learn by making mistakes. All I am saying is that we also need to make students cognizant of the fact that industry is not as forgiving as academia(can be).

      3. I completely agree with you that we should not be discouraging students and telling them that “this is not your cup of tea”, especially because academia is their time to learn by making mistakes. All I am saying is that we also need to make students cognizant of the fact that industry is not as forgiving as academia(can be).

        1. You’re 100% right. In fact I tell them to fail now, in my class, because failing in industry can have serious consequences.

  2. Dr.Dweck’s talk is really interesting because it explains the importance of the concept “not yet”. She points out it is important to praise students but, “praise wisely”. Learning is not about getting a good grade and get done with it. So by encouraging their hard work rather giving a grade to the end product is important. So that the students develop their mindset such that if they want to achieve something they have to work hard for it. Also not to be scared of challenges and most importantly not to be scared of failures. Instead, students should get the idea that failure means you are “not yet “there, so work hard to get there.

  3. Hi. I also love the concept of “not yet” instead of a F. I believe many students lack the confidence and motivation to do well in a class. A F in a class assignment does not motivate anyone. For me, it has the opposite effect. Students start believing that they are not able of performing well in class, and they feel defined by the grade they were given. Besides that, i believe that professors should make a real effort to connect with students and show them that they matter. For me, grades do not define one’s capacity to do a good job.

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