Category Archives: Sarah Hanks

Trends in the Nonprofit Sector: A Fresh Call for Change

The Independent Sector (IS) (2015), a national umbrella service organization for nonprofit entities, recently released Threads: Insights from the charitable community, a publication highlighting the opportunities and challenges identified by its stakeholders—nonprofit executives, board members, corporate and government leaders—during a … Continue reading

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Accountability in the Nonprofit Sector: The Donor’s Role in Financing and Monitoring Social Change

The popular press and other mass communications outlets are replete today with expressions of concern about accountability in the nonprofit sector. The topic is also the focus of scholarly research that typically highlights the multifaceted responsibilities of nonprofit organization managers … Continue reading

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Examining the tensions that frame nonprofit governance: The roles and responsibilities of nonprofit chief executives and board members

The complexity of executive director-governing board relationships, coupled with the rapid rate of change confronting the nonprofit sector invite an examination of the roles and responsibilities of these major actors.  The relationship between the chief executive of a nonprofit and … Continue reading

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Nonprofit Boards as Communities of Practice: Identity, social learning, and the distinction between “knowing that” and “knowing how”

As a doctoral student, I am often asked about my future career plans.  With excitement, I share that I would like to support nonprofit organizations in achieving effective board governance.  In response, some people smile and nod, passively dismissing the … Continue reading

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Re-Framing Social Change: What questions should guide today’s NGO Leaders and social entrepreneurs?

Popular mythology concerning them notwithstanding, any effort to come to grips with the purposes and desired outcomes of today’s nonprofit and nongovernmental (NGO) organizations requires a thorough examination of the complexity of the problems they face, the social systems in … Continue reading

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