Open Science Prize Entries Show the Power of Open Content and Data – Vote for Your Favorite by Jan 6, 2017!

The Open Science Prize, encourages experimentation with open content and open data to enable discoveries that improve health and push research forward. Six finalist projects address: FDA Trials; Emerging diseases; Mental and neurological disease modeling; Open Neuroimaging data; Rare disease research; and Global air quality.

Vote for your favorite project! Voting ends January 6, 2017,11:59pm PST.

The Wellcome Trust, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have sponsored this award, “to stimulate the development of novel and ground-breaking tools and platforms to enable the reuse and repurposing of open digital research objects relevant to biomedical or health applications.” Further details about the contest are described in the Open Science Prize FAQ and in this Open Science Prize Vision and Overview from the BD2K Open Data Science Symposium, #BD2KOpenSci.

Presentation videos by each of the 6 finalist groups are available from the BD2K Open Data Science Symposium. The project titles below link to descriptions on the Open Science Prize site. Try them out and learn more about each project before you vote! Or, if you missed the vote, go explore anyway to experience these innovative platforms that make open data and research results work towards our better health:

(*Beyond the Open Science Prize, explore even more topics on Open Data and Open Research for Health via December 2016 All Hands Meeting and Open Data Symposium video archives.)

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About Virginia (Ginny) Pannabecker

I am a Health, Life Sciences, and Scholarly Communication Librarian at Virginia Tech where I work with students, staff, and faculty in Life and Health Sciences, and provide training on and support for Scholarly Communication. My work experience includes over fifteen years in academic libraries. My research interests include: effective teaching methods for adult learners; motivators and barriers to adoption of open research and open publishing practices; and effective tools and methods for cross-institutional research project collaboration.
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