Networked Learning

This week, we are tasked with writing about the benefits of networked learning, e.g. blogging, in higher education. Blogging is something that prior to last semester’s Preparing the Future Professoriate course I had never tried. It seemed like too much pressure for too little reward to post my writing online. What if I said something stupid? Anything you post online, even after you delete it, lives on in one form or another, never to be truly reclaimed. For me blogging has been helpful in helping me get over this. As Seth Godin says, it is more about the exercise of forcing yourself to write than the final product itself. It really forces you to think about what you’re saying and how to get it across concisely. Doug Belshaw suggests that working openly by default has virtues in and of itself. Much like the open data movement, sharing as much information as possible as broadly as possible can only help further discussions with colleagues and others in your field. It may even help those in similar fields dealing with similar challenges. The potential to create a more public dialogue using blogs is immense. Hopefully over time, we as academics will learn to use blogs and other media to converse more openly and effectively with one another. Technology changes all the time, but online discourse will continue in one form or another so there is no harm in getting in as much practice as possible!

 

References:
Belshaw, D. (2014, June 14). Working openly on the web: a manifesto • Literacies. Retrieved from http://literaci.es/working-openly-a-manifesto

Campbell, W. (2016, January 11). Networked Learning as Experiential Learning. Retrieved from http://er.educause.edu/articles/2016/1/networked-learning-as-experiential-learning.

Godin, S. (2009, April 18). Seth Godin & Tom Peters on blogging. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=livzJTIWlmY&feature=youtu.be

Hitchcock, T. (2015, July 27). Twitter and blogs are not just add-ons to academic research, but a simple reflection of the passion underpinning it. Retrieved from http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2014/07/28/twitter-and-blogs-academic-public-sphere/

 

2 thoughts on “Networked Learning”

  1. “Hopefully over time, we as academics will learn to use blogs and other media to converse more openly and effectively with one another.”

    I could not agree with you more. Academics historically have this tendency to work in isolation. Many of my colleagues were paranoid that someone would steal their idea or publication, a thought process which genuinely confused me. I hope that sharing information openly and collaboratively will allow for a more free exchange of information and more interdisciplinary research.

  2. I agree with your comments about the usefulness of information sharing among academics. I believe research is a team endeavor and always feel confused about the number of scientists who are looking for some kind of individual glory or recognition.

    “it is more about the exercise of forcing yourself to write than the final product itself” was also one of the statements that stuck with me because I completely agree with the value of the process itself, but actually posting it does add a layer of pressure since you are actually sharing with the everyone who has access to it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *