Diversity or Blasphemy – The Role of Religiosity in the Reinforcement of Sameness

 

This past week, an art exhibition promoting gender diversity in Brazil was cancelled due to an overwhelming social media protest stating that the show was promoting blasphemy, pedophilia and bestiality because some of the pieces conflicted with widely held views in the country.

 

The cancellation of this event made me begin to think about the role of religiosity in the reinforcement of sameness. Within the United States, many of our rules and laws have been established based on some interpretation of the Christian religion. Whether or not these interpretations truly represent Christianity can be debated, but one thing is for certain – they do not represent the supposed principles of freedom and equality that the United States seems to espouse so freely.

 

I believe that younger generations of U.S. citizens are beginning to recognize the hypocrisy that is the United States and its issues with diversity as the number of Americans that subscribe to Christianity (or any religion) is declining. Which begs one to question, are our diversity problems the fault of Christian religious interpretations gone bad? And how do we become an inclusive society if we are built upon archaic rules that were more than likely misinterpreted to fit the needs of the “founding-fathers?”

 

4 thoughts on “Diversity or Blasphemy – The Role of Religiosity in the Reinforcement of Sameness

  • September 12, 2017 at 8:46 pm
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    Being Jewish, it has long bothered me that in the USA we supposedly have “separation of church and state.” However, it is apparent almost every day that this is a farce. I get Christian holidays off from work, but not any Jewish (or Hindu, Buddist, etc) holidays. The standard pledge of allegiance still has “under G-d,” and when we swear in court to tell the whole truth, many places still include “so help me G-d.” Religion has its place and is an important part of billions of peoples’ lives. But, it should not be part of our government. Arguments against gay marriage, for example, should not lawfully include “but the Bible says.”

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  • September 18, 2017 at 10:20 pm
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    I wouldn’t say that younger generations are “recognizing the hypocrisy of religion” just because the number of people who identify as Christians is declining. Non-affiliation does not necessarily indicate any specific thoughts. There is a lot of research on adolescents and young adults that indicates that religion is a coping mechanism and helps strengthen identity.

    I also don’t really think that our laws are based off of the Christian religion… many of our values, yes. Which is where religion should remain (like Erin said), which I think gets at what you’re saying. I don’t think that diversity problems are Christian interpretations gone bad, but I definitely do think that religion in general can be used to bolster an argument against diversity and inclusion. But I think that if someone is making an argument against diversity and inclusion, they will twist anything they can to support their argument.

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  • September 18, 2017 at 10:24 pm
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    Oops forgot to add– thanks for including the link about the art show. I thought that was very interesting and I’m still not sure what to make of it.

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  • September 19, 2017 at 6:51 pm
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    Do religious groups have a chance of sharing a decent society if only their religion dominates it?

    Has secularism taken on its own form of fundamentalism? That is, does a secular agenda risk becoming as oppressive as a fundamentalist religious agenda?

    Your post brought these questions up for me. Thanks!

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