Roger, a goat and a rabbit

Chapter two from Paulo Freire was probably the best thing I have read in the course thus far. I would assess his argument as being in the realm of public intellectualism in that it inspires subjects to receive an education that makes them active doers in the world. There is a spiritual echo present here that chooses ‘becoming’ over ‘being’, action over intellectual description.

Perhaps in an effort to begin the process of a dialogic, problem-posing education would be to open up what Freiri calls the ‘banking concept of education’ (i.e., an act of depositing knowledge from active subjects to passive recipients). Freire gives a (humorous?) analogy of the banking concept of education that deals with a form of knowledge that has no bearing on reality. Thus, we teach a “vital question” like “Roger gave green grass to the goat” only to instead come to learn that actually “Roger gave green grass to the rabbit”. Exaggeration aside, is this true to our experience of education? I would love to begin a dialogue on what you think this analogy is meant to represent within the banking model of education? I have an idea, but need further clarity from other disciplines.

I also wonder how Freire’s pedagogy for the oppressed would approach the idea of technology in the classroom? Thoughts?

Chomsky sees the education of Freire as consciousness raising. I also really appreciated how lucidly Freire shows the relationship of language to power and ideology. Cultivated languages essentially masquerade as ideology and power. Nevertheless for Freire, one must have an acquaintance with the dominant linguistic pattern, but it is not necessary that they imbue the dominant pattern. Their learning it is for different reasons than say aspirations for wealth or prideful articulation. Rather, it is so they can voice their oppression so it be understood by others. His reinterpretation of Marxism, fused into a spiritual liberation theology that is active, focusing on education for life, that is anti-necrophilia has, after a long time, convinced me that we can and should do something to change our educational system, one teacher at a time — beginning with YOU.

 

7 thoughts on “Roger, a goat and a rabbit”

  1. Freire really struck a chord with me as well when I first saw his work. Immediately, I could relate to the feeling of having knowledge deposited on me from some of my former engineering profs. Interesting question about how Freire would view technology in the classroom. One thought is he may think it could be a useful tool, but could also be a hindrance if used inappropriately further reinforcing the banking model.

    1. I think that we have seen exactly that regarding technology in the classroom.

      When technology has been used as a cool way to help facilitate conversation and critical thinking, such as in this class, it is a very useful tool.

      However, when it is used simply to deposit information and reinforce the banking model, it does not inspire real learning. I’ve taken some online modules that try to “impart information” to me, and I typically just skip to the end and take the quiz!

  2. I agree with Gary, technology itself is not going to create the “epistemological curiosity” for which Freire argues. Rather it is how we use technology to foster curiosity and knowledge creation. This has theme has played over in my head as I have been revising my syllabus and thinking about ways I can use technology not to dump information on the floor of the classroom but to encourage students and myself to create knowledge through deliberate explorations. Each time I add to the syllabus, I ask myself: Is this something that will generate curiosity or could I put it on a thumb drive and have the students regurgitate the information at a later date? If the the former, then it stays; if the later, it goes in the pile of things to look at if you can’t fall asleep at night.

  3. Thanks for the post! As for the question about Freire’s view of technology, I tend to think he would appreciate its use in the way we saw in the game playing/game creation programs we discussed earlier. However, I could see (and have experienced) how technology could easily be used to only further ‘the oppression’ (i.e. online quizzes). It’s all about how the resource is used.

  4. in that it inspires subjects to receive an education that makes them active doers in the world. There is a spiritual echo present here that chooses ‘becoming’ over ‘being’, action over intellectual description.

    Perhaps in an effort to begin the process of a dialogic, problem-posing education would be to open up what Freiri calls the ‘banking concept of education’ (i.e., an act of depositing knowledge from active subjects to passive recipients). Freire gives a (humorous?) analogy of the banking concept of education that deals with a form of knowledge that has no bearing on reality. Thus, we

  5. lism in that it inspires subjects to receive an education that makes them active doers in the world. There is a spiritual echo present here that chooses ‘becoming’ over ‘being’, action over intellectual description.

    Perhaps in an effort to begin the process of a dialogic, problem-posing education would be to open up what Freiri calls the ‘banking concept of education’ (i.e., an act

  6. n up what Freiri calls the ‘banking concept of education’ (i.e., an act of depositing knowledge from active subjects to passive recipients). Freire give

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *