What to say

So I was reading some blogs from my classmates who have come up with some very insightful, metaphorical posts that get me thinking about how I fit into this world of higher education.  I would provide a link to those, but I’m still new to this blogging thing.  As I was reading those posts, I found myself wondering what I could possibly write that anyone would want to read.  For that matter, what can I talk about as a professor that people will want to listen to?  I have worked with a number of clients as a counselor and helped them recognize their goals.  I have also been able to teach classes before, and help students learn and move towards their academic goals.  So that must mean that I have enough to say to make a difference.  I am not sure how many people will even read this post, but I would imagine many of you have felt this same way before.  So many of us going into higher education want to make a difference in people’s lives.  If we remain silently in the background, those positive changes that we seek may never occur.  So I am going to say something in this blog that may or may not make any difference to the world, but it is a start.  The bystander effect takes place when a number of people witness an event and all are thinking, “Someone should do something about that.”  The issue occurs when everyone in the group thinks that way and so nobody actually acts on those thoughts.  I encourage each of you to recognize the value in what you have to pass along to the world through being in higher education.  This doesn’t necessarily mean that everything we have to say is perfect for the time or place, but choosing our words and actions wisely can lead to the positive changes that so many of us are seeking by pursuing graduate education.  Thanks for reading!

One thought on “What to say”

  1. Agreed. Here’s a spin on your post…everyone in the room agreeing that the instruction they are receiving is subpar, but no one says anything. In the context of learning, I think there are dimensions to the bystander effect. Thank you for the post.

Leave a Reply to Henry Smart Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *