Tag Archives: User experience

Your typing teacher isn’t relevant: Double spacing after a period is wrong

If you learned typing on a typewriter, you were taught to double space after a period. This was because typewriters used mono-spaced fonts like Courier with each letter and punctuation symbol the same width, meaning periods could be hard to distinguish… Continue reading

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Check inbound links before moving or deleting that web page

Changes to the website happen all the time, but when moving a page from one directory to another or deleting a page altogether, you’ll want to know what other pages link to it, so you can be sure those link either continue to work, or are removed so th… Continue reading

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Additional principles for the websites

New content continues to be added to the website. Recently completed sections include copyright and spaces. In addition to our existing style guide, a few additional principle are guiding how new content is put together and presented to the public. Continue reading

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Library jargon

One of the most common tenets for creating library websites is to avoid library jargon. I’m not sure I agree with this completely; after all, no chemistry instructor would say his students would learn more if he avoided technical chemistry terms. Still, we can lessen confusion by using more common terminology when ever possible.

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Don’t make me think: usability guidance from Steve Krug

An excellent (and surprisingly brief) resource on web usability is Don’t Make Me Think by Steve Krug. It offers great suggestion on designing labels and headings, layout choices, and basic content to account for how people really use and read web pages. It has directly influenced choices made on our web pages.

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