“History of Science and Technology in China”

By: hoganq97

Quinn Hogan (298) For starters, much of what we know about the History of Technology in China is thanks to Joseph Needham. Needham studied much of China during his life, and helped display what technologies were used an invented in China throughout a massive time period of around 2000 B.C.E, and 1000 C.E. Such technologies in question are gunpowder, the compass, paper making,  and printing. These were known as the "Four Great Inventions of Ancient China." The four great inventions were extremely ...

“How the Iron Age Began” Robert Maddin

By: hoganq97

Quinn Hogan (379)   Robert Maddin, James Muhly, and Tamra Wheeler try to pin point the closest possible time period at which the "Iron Age" came into History. A few important things the authors put forward for clarity is how the iron age did not begin because people discovered iron. As the authors say, "Iron was known as a workable metal during most if not all of the Bronze Age." This is their first distinction, which is why exactly the bronze age ...

“History of Science and Technology in China”

By: hoganq97

Quinn Hogan (298) For starters, much of what we know about the History of Technology in China is thanks to Joseph Needham. Needham studied much of China during his life, and helped display what technologies were used an invented in China throughout a massive time period of around 2000 B.C.E, and 1000 C.E. Such technologies in question are gunpowder, the compass, paper making,  and printing. These were known as the "Four Great Inventions of Ancient China." The four great inventions were extremely influential in China, and all around the world. Paper and printing were important for the spreading of information, news, and keeping records, among other things. The compass was helpful for exploration and trading. People had to ensure they were going the correct way. The compass could also assist militarily, which was how gunpowder was used. These technologies were quite impressive for ...

“How the Iron Age Began” Robert Maddin

By: hoganq97

Quinn Hogan (379)   Robert Maddin, James Muhly, and Tamra Wheeler try to pin point the closest possible time period at which the "Iron Age" came into History. A few important things the authors put forward for clarity is how the iron age did not begin because people discovered iron. As the authors say, "Iron was known as a workable metal during most if not all of the Bronze Age." This is their first distinction, which is why exactly the bronze age came to a close. Bronze has many advantages over iron, including its resistance to corrosion, and it takes less production time to create a bronze weapon. This is huge in terms of early civilizations with how much conflict was occurring. Being able to arm your entire army quicker means you can mount fronts faster, and generally attack at a quicker ...

August 27th: Agriculture and Power in Ancient Mesoamerica

By: hoganq97

Quinn Hogan (346) David A. Freidel explains the relationship between farmers in Mesoamerica, and the lands which they held. The biggest point he is trying to thrust at the audience of this article, is how and why farmers in Mesoamerican civilizations allowed rulers to lay claim to the control of their agricultural yields. Freidel goes on to tell us about the different crops these farmers grew, and how different cultures, environments and geographical conditions determined this. The first big concept within this article to understand is that Mesoamerican farmers relinquished control of their farms, but not the labor on them, to the higher power in the civilization. This means although they were planting and harvesting, the crop yield and what would happen to it, was owned by the king or queen. But why would the farmers give up this land so easily? A ...

Hello world!

By: hoganq97

Welcome to Blogs@VT Sites. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!