PBL Learning: Getting Comfortable with the Uncomfortable

Disclaimer: I held many reservations toward problem-based learning (PBL) projects being used in undergraduate courses before beginning this week. Before the course, I was familiar with the concept but primarily saw PBL implemented in not higher but secondary education contexts. Continue reading PBL Learning: Getting Comfortable with the Uncomfortable

Making Critical Pedagogy ‘Open’: Learning Together in a Digital World

It was really nice to be more ‘textually’ engaged with Paulo Freire. I really enjoyed the clip showed a couple of week to end class and hearing him especially emphasize the benefit of problematizing assumptions that the professor is the Continue reading Making Critical Pedagogy ‘Open’: Learning Together in a Digital World

A Progressive Teaching Philosophy

“The self-paced nature of exploratory learning  relies on the notion that effective learning environments actively engage students with the material and promote meaningful associations between new material and information already known.”    B. Jean Mandernach, PhD ——————————————– This was an Continue reading A Progressive Teaching Philosophy

Instructor Provocation, Student Imagination: Networked Learning(?)

As someone else noted, the most notable takeaway from this week’s materials on ‘Networked Learning”– those connections maintained and transfered in a near reciprocal level between educator and student on and via networked platforms –there are immeditae concerns raised when Continue reading Instructor Provocation, Student Imagination: Networked Learning(?)

University Preservation at What Cost?: Continued Lessons from Michigan State University

Sincerely fell bad for any Michigan State University almuni reading this. You all have read, seen, and been inundated with enough reports, trial coverage, and PR emails to placate the obvious concerns raised from the fallout of indictments of concerning Continue reading University Preservation at What Cost?: Continued Lessons from Michigan State University

University [and Education] for Sale: Yes, Universities are For-Profit

Many average American students and their family and friends were appalled and dismayed at modern higher educational institutions after hearing in August, 2016 that a slew of for-profit colleges, especially ITT Technical Institute and Devry University, were barred from further Continue reading University [and Education] for Sale: Yes, Universities are For-Profit

Professorial Ethics: Student-Advisor Relations, Judith Butler, and Group Affiliation Commentary

On August 16, 2018, Nimrod Reitman, a former graduate student of New York University (NYU), filed a lawsuit against the university and his former adviser, professor of German and comparative literature, Avital Ronell. In the lawsuit, Reitman claimed that  while a PhD Continue reading Professorial Ethics: Student-Advisor Relations, Judith Butler, and Group Affiliation Commentary

Multidisciplinary Citizen Science: An Open Call to All

Within the last three-to-four decades, American universities and their professoriate have documented, critiqued, and engaged in highly participatory action, monitoring, and participation in research. Based more on bottom-up organization and demography of researchers—not derivative of academic institutions—, a form of Continue reading Multidisciplinary Citizen Science: An Open Call to All