Delanie Tarvin: The “Lost Cause” and Civil War Denialism

In “The Anatomy of the Myth,” Alan T. Nolan discusses Civil War denialism, specifically focusing on the “Lost Cause” perspective. Nolan outlines the claims that Lost Cause proponents make, and then explains the purpose this view serves. First, Lost Cause Continue reading Delanie Tarvin: The “Lost Cause” and Civil War Denialism

Delanie Tarvin: Walter A. McDougall and Sputnik’s Political Impact

  In the introduction to his book . . . the Heavens and the Earth, Walter A. McDougall discusses the political responses to Sputnik, focusing on the effect it had on the relationship between the government and new technology. McDougall Continue reading Delanie Tarvin: Walter A. McDougall and Sputnik’s Political Impact

Delanie Tarvin: Sputnik and the Dawn of the Space Age

For this week’s blog, I explored NASA’s description of Sputnik, reading its brief historical timeline titled “Sputnik and The Dawn of the Space Age”. This website describes the launch of Sputnik as causing developments in various fields like technology and Continue reading Delanie Tarvin: Sputnik and the Dawn of the Space Age

Historiography in WWI’s Diplomatic (and a bit of Economic) History

In “Remembering the forgotten war: America historiography on World War I,” Jennifer D. Keene describes different perspectives on the diplomatic and economic history of World War One, specifically focusing on the main reasons the US joined the war, what America’s Continue reading Historiography in WWI’s Diplomatic (and a bit of Economic) History

Delanie Tarvin: How the British Felt About the Korean War and US Decision-Making

In “Presidential Decision Making in the Korean War: The British Perspective,” Michael A. Lutzker¬† details the course of the war, focusing primarily on the British perspective. To start,¬†Lutzker discusses the “series of paradoxes” within this conflict (Lutzker, 979). First is Continue reading Delanie Tarvin: How the British Felt About the Korean War and US Decision-Making