zookat13

Considering Latin names and the -ologies through the lens of mindful teaching

As part of the undergraduate wildlife conservation curriculum, students are expected to take several different “-ologies” courses. These courses are focused on a specific group of organisms, covering key concepts in their biology and natural history as well as basic identification. Most of these classes are split into a lecture focused on biology and natural …

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Critical Pedagogy: Thoughts on alternative grading approaches

During this week’s class on critical pedagogy, we discussed several different grading approaches, and briefly touched on the pros and cons of them. Some of the approaches are ones that I was unfamiliar with, so I did some follow-up research to learn more.  For my blog post, I’d like to briefly summarize what I learned …

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My experiences with online and distance learning: The good, the bad, and the ugly

This seems like an especially well-timed blog topic, given that I missed last week’s class while traveling for a conference and am catching up via the class recording. (Note for Anurag: I also prefer to leave my shoelaces tied in between wearings. There are dozens of us!) I’ve had a few experiences with online and …

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Digital Pedagogy and Fieldwork

I was surprised to find “fieldwork” while scrolling through the list of terms in the MLA’s collection on digital pedagogy. As someone not very familiar with the humanities, I was curious to learn more about what humanities fieldwork entails, and how digital tools could be applied to something that is so deeply connected to the …

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Moving forward

Over the past few weeks, we’ve learned about inclusive pedagogy and case-/project-/problem-based learning. As we move to another professor and another section of the class, it’s time to reflect and figure out how to use what we’ve learned so far. For inclusive pedagogy, the biggest thing that has stood out to me is the idea …

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My experiences with case-based and project-based learning

When I look back on all the classes that I have taken over the course of my undergraduate and graduate studies, there are three that really stand out as having influenced my approach to education, learning, and teaching. All of these classes were on different topics, taught by different professors, and impacted me in different …

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Diversity and Inclusion in Wildlife Conservation

When you think of a wildlife biologist, what kind of person do you think of? Going a step further, if I asked you to name a wildlife biologist, who would come to mind? Many people would answer with one of the following three: Steve Irwin, aka the Crocodile Hunter, a well-known zookeeper and nature documentary …

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PowerPoint: Useful teaching tool or lazy lecturing?

I recently came across an online article entitled “Let’s ban PowerPoint in lectures-it makes students more stupid and professors more boring.” (https://theconversation.com/lets-ban-powerpoint-in-lectures-it-makes-students-more-stupid-and-professors-more-boring-36183?utm_campaign=meetedgar&utm_medium=social&utm_source=meetedgar.com&fbclid=IwAR3d6KHdlo3Bz7qsJ00aQjoT0iBEHO5oFK2HZpc_j5VltBw8-TGqzGXpFjc) The author, Bent Meier Sørensen, proposes that we should ban PowerPoint slides from lecture classes on the grounds that they are boring, they limit interaction between teachers and students during class, and they …

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Future of the University

Our prompt this week was to write about one thing that we believe should change in higher education. I struggled for quite awhile to pick a topic. There are a lot of great ideas in higher education, but also a lot of issues. Some of them, like skyrocketing tuition and the abysmal salary:work ratio for …

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Academia and outreach

Over the last few weeks, the graduate student listserv for our department has shared calls for volunteers for a variety of upcoming outreach events. These opportunities include teaching first graders about local wildlife, creating engaging activities for elementary school students at a summer STEM camp, and helping organize a on-campus fishing tournament for local anglers. …

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