Day 5: Design Failure as Public Tourist Attraction

Everyone successfully made it off the boat and onto our tour bus. We had a great guide who gave us a great overview of Stockholm’s history and all the major highlights of Sweden’s rise and plateau to what it is today.

The day started with a great guided tour of the City Hall, the location of the distribution of the Nobel Prizes, sans Peace. There was some debate over the appropriateness of the gold mosaic art nouveau decor of the Golden Hall but I personally really liked it. Though that could have been due to my love of anything by Klimt and this room reeked of Klimt even if he wasn’t commissioned to do this work. For anyone interested, it was designed by Einor Forseth. With some free time I peeled off again with Pete who, luckily for me, enjoys looking at old churches as much as I do. And unlike Helsinki these churches were actually open! We were three for three!

City Hall

City Hall

Blue Hall

Blue Hall

Golden Hall

Golden Hall

After a brief check-in at the hotel it was off to the Vasa Museum, or as I like to now refer to it, the museum dedicated to design failure. The Vasa was a Swedish warship built in Stockholm that had her maiden voyage on April 10, 1628, we’ll pick a time of say 10:15 am. She sunk 30 minutes later. Yup, sunk….in Stockholm harbor. The designer poorly placed some cannon holes and one good gust of wind and she sunk. In the 1960s it was raised and now has a great museum that provides information about Sweden’s naval history and these types of ships. But I still had a hard time forking money over to see something that sank because of a design failure. I also kept thinking back to my various classes such as Project Management, Org Behavior, Operations, etc. and kept thinking that had they only had an MBA with their PM certification that the design flaw may have been spotted sooner. I think I might see a case coming out of this visit. Smilie: :-)

Vasa Warship

Vasa Warship

Because it was still relatively early we decided to wander around Djurgarden, the island we were on. Being a good sport, Pete let me have some fun outside the Abba museum before we went to Skansen, the world’s first open-air museum. The best description I can come up with is that it’s like Colonial Williamsburg with a Nordic zoo. We saw some really interesting Swedish homes dating from the 1700’s and also saw reindeer, moose, peacocks, seals, and lynx. I wish we had been able to get there earlier when more of the exhibits had been staffed but it was an enjoyable couple of hours.

Outside the Abba Museum

Outside the Abba Museum

Pete bullied into having his picture taken with Abba

Pete bullied into having his picture taken with Abba

Skansen Home

Skansen Home

Pete the Peacock Whisperer

Pete the Peacock Whisperer

We were able to navigate back to the hotel via the public ferry and after an enjoyable dinner I am finding myself read for bed. Since we have a 7am call time and I do not want a repeat of yesterday morning, I think I’m going to call it a night.

Moi moi!

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