Monthly Archives: May 2012

Summer Days, Drifting Away

The semester has ended, and summer is upon us.  Last summer I poured myself into research, and worked seven days a week on data reduction in order to get three papers submitted for the August 1 deadline for the big conference in my field.  Only one paper was accepted, and it ended up being my hobby paper, entirely unrelated to my thesis.  I’m in a different mental place this year, and I plan to submit whatever gets done between now and then; it’s not worth burning myself out to accomplish more.

As part of my effort to re-center and reactivate myself I’ve decided to set aside Fridays to study away from the house and away from the lab.  I plan to work on developing the Achieve Academe thing (I really need to come up with better ways to describe it) that’s been started, flesh out my webpage, and do some reading.  I keep hearing other people talk about summer reading, and I want to jump on that band wagon, though I think people might not agree with my recreational reading choices.

First up on my list of summer books are the textbooks that are required reading for the coming school year.  Next year will be my last year of classes, and I’m splitting it evenly between statistics and engineering education.  Some of these books I’m more excited to read than others, but I think I’ll enjoy them all.

In addition to the required texts, I’ve added a few more to my reading list…

Transportation Statistics and Microsimulation, by Spiegelman, Park, and Rilett

If for some bizarre reason I finish all of the books on my plate, what else along this vein should I be reading? What are your favorite books on education?  What books have you read that changed the way you looked at the world?

Continue reading

Posted in Academia, Grad School, instruction, reading, transportation

Summer Days, Drifting Away

The semester has ended, and summer is upon us.  Last summer I poured myself into research, and worked seven days a week on data reduction in order to get three papers submitted for the August 1 deadline for the big conference in my field.  Only one paper was accepted, and it ended up being my hobby paper, entirely unrelated to my thesis.  I’m in a different mental place this year, and I plan to submit whatever gets done between now and then; it’s not worth burning myself out to accomplish more.

As part of my effort to re-center and reactivate myself I’ve decided to set aside Fridays to study away from the house and away from the lab.  I plan to work on developing the Achieve Academe thing (I really need to come up with better ways to describe it) that’s been started, flesh out my webpage, and do some reading.  I keep hearing other people talk about summer reading, and I want to jump on that band wagon, though I think people might not agree with my recreational reading choices.

First up on my list of summer books are the textbooks that are required reading for the coming school year.  Next year will be my last year of classes, and I’m splitting it evenly between statistics and engineering education.  Some of these books I’m more excited to read than others, but I think I’ll enjoy them all.

In addition to the required texts, I’ve added a few more to my reading list…

Transportation Statistics and Microsimulation, by Spiegelman, Park, and Rilett

If for some bizarre reason I finish all of the books on my plate, what else along this vein should I be reading? What are your favorite books on education?  What books have you read that changed the way you looked at the world?

Continue reading

Posted in Academia, Grad School, instruction, reading, transportation

The Visions of Students Today

This is interesting to watch by Michael Wesch. He is an associate professor of cultural anthropology at Kansas State University. He focuses on media ecology and the emerging field of digital ethnography, including the study of the effect of new … Continue reading Continue reading

blogs leading to blogs

As I’ve mentioned before, prior to starting my own blog, I was apprehensive about the whole situation. Now that I have settled into it a little bit more, I’m kind of getting into other blogs. Though none of them are … Continue reading Continue reading

It may be satire…

…but it also is perfectly relevant to the discussion we had in PFP about teaching evaluations: http://www.theonion.com/articles/professor-deeply-hurt-by-students-evaluation,20130/ and the last “quote” is especially relevant to the discussion in GEDI about teaching responsibilities: “Students and the enormous revenue they bring in to our institution … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in GRAD 5104, PFP, satire, Teaching, teaching evaluations

Quotes for making the guidelines from aspiration to success!

It is literally true that you can succeed best and quickest by helping others to succeed.    Napoleon Hill. I cannot give you a formula for success, but I can give you the formula for failure – which is: try to please everybody.    Herbert Bayard Swope What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; […] Continue reading

Effective Books

  These effective books were chosen based on the recommendation of friends and teachers. Let me know if you want to add more on this list. 1) The one minute manager 2) Women’s way of knowing 3) How to win Friends and Influence People 4) The Habits of Highly Effective People 5) Proposals that Work 6) […] Continue reading

Modern medicine saves countless lives but makes us weaker compared to our ancestors

This interesting article modern medicine and evolution suggest that the current medical system is preventing natural selection in humans, allowing for weaker genes/traits to propagate.  While I champion the advances in medicine and the countless lives spared utilizing it, I … Continue reading Continue reading

Beware online “filter bubbles”

There are few people nowadays in the world that do not know what internet, social media and search engines are. In addition to those who argue that some of these engines or making us stupid, some believe that these engines … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in gedivts12, PFP 2012

A Matter of Standards

Last night on my bike ride home from PFP class I mentally prepared a “todo list” of things to get done in the couple of hours I’d have  before getting too tired to be productive.  In a classic example of … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in ASCII, engineering, GEDI, internationalization, PFP, standards