Move to the Dark Side

I have officially moved my blog away from blogs.lt.vt.edu to my own website: hazyblue.me, which eventually will host not only my blog, but also my teaching philosophy, CV and other professional- related tidbits. I hope that everyone will follow me over to the dark-side as I continue to write about education, technology and talking cows. I would especially like to hear feedback on my latest post (inspired by the likes of Janet Murray and Alfred Whitehead), but since I haven’t set up a commenting system yet, please respond via your own blog, a tweet, or an email directly to me!

Structure, Language and Art

In a recent post tylera5 commented that the last time he wrote poetry was in high school, and wasn’t expecting to have to write a poem for a programming course. I got the idea for a poetry assignment from a friend of mine who teaches a biological science course. She found that the challenge of condensing a technical topic into a 17 syllable Haiku really forces one to think critically about the subject and filter through all the information to shake out the key concept. And poems about tech topics are just fun to read!

I think the benefit is even increased for a programming course. As tylera5 mentioned, both poems had a structure, and he had to think a bit about how to put his thoughts into the structure dictated by the poetry form, whether it be the 5/7/5 syllable structure of a Haiku, or the AABBA rhyming scheme of a limerick.

Poetry is the expression of ideas and thoughts through structured language (and the structure can play a larger or lesser roll depending on the poet, and type of poetry). Programming also is the expression of ideas and thoughts through structured language. The domain of ideas is often more restricted (though not necessarily, this article and book could be the subject of a full post in its own right) and adherence to structure is more strict, but there is an art to both forms of expression.

Are there artistic and expressive tools in other STEM topics as well?

What Makes Good Software Good?

The first day of class (ECE2524: Introduction to Unix for Engineers) I asked participents the  open ended question “What makes good software good?” and asked them to answer both “for the developer” and “for the consumer”.

I generated a list of words and phrases for each sub-response and then normalized it based on my own intuition (e.g. I changed “simplicity” to “simple”, “easy to use” to “intuitive”, etc.). I then dumped the list into Wordle to generate these images:

Good Software for the Consumer

Good Software for the Consumer

Good Software for the Developer

Good Software for the Developer

For a future in-class exercise I plan to ask participants to link the common themes that appear in these word clouds back to specific rules mentioned in the reading.