About Brian

I'm Brian, a Junior at Virginia Tech studying Computer Science. My hobbies include cars, computers, and taking things apart. Sometimes I even put those things back together successfully! When I graduate I plan on entering the security field, as that is where my true passion lies.

Thoughts about the second class

This is my second time taking this part of 2524. Last semester, I had scheduling issues and had to drop it, but I did so after a few weeks of class. Now that I am taking it again, I am going into the class with a different attitude. Now I have gone into the class with some experience with Ubuntu and Shell and bash, and other various ideas that we use in this class, rather than none. I never really thought about it that way, and especially didn't think that my little experience in the class before was enough to make me a lot more comfortable in class now. I look forward to the rest of the semester, and becoming fluent in terminal operations.
Posted in Uncategorized

Thoughts about the second class

This is my second time taking this part of 2524. Last semester, I had scheduling issues and had to drop it, but I did so after a few weeks of class. Now that I am taking it again, I am going into the class with a different attitude. Now I have gone into the class with some experience with Ubuntu and Shell and bash, and other various ideas that we use in this class, rather than none. I never really thought about it that way, and especially didn't think that my little experience in the class before was enough to make me a lot more comfortable in class now. I look forward to the rest of the semester, and becoming fluent in terminal operations.
Posted in Uncategorized

Command School

Today I had a crash course in many commands used for Linux. During class, and during the discussion, I noticed a good amount of similarities between commands, even ones that didnt have anything to do with each other. There were a few categories that the commands fit into:

  1. Commands that read/write a file and file attributes
  2. Commands that undo the file attribute changes
  3. Commands that change system settings
  4. Commands that undo system settings
  5. Help
It seems as though all basic commands fit somewhere in this list. There are many variations of most commands, though.

Between the commands themselves, some similarities that I noticed are that they all are a command and then a user defined variable that dictates what to do the command on. This usually means that something is going to be read or changed. Sometimes there are variables like -a to do something to "all".

These similar traits relate to the Basics of the Unix Philosophy because they provide a way to see and change many attributes and files, and even allow you to create your own programs. This shows that Unix really is "free", as nothing is really hidden in some way.

During the first class, the class was asked to write what we think good code is and what a good program is. Here are the word clouds from the responses:

I think that it is interesting to see how the most used words kind of describe what Unix is all about: freedom. Most words come from the fact that Unix is so open. This way, there are thousands of "developers" who all have the opportunity to catch bugs, and give patch suggestions to make the next version better, increasing the intuitiveness of the OS and fixing bugs. This will also increase the efficiency of the system since so many people can have an input.

As seen by the success of such an operating system, it is pretty safe to say that the source code is easy to read, as so many people have worked on it, and having worked on it they must be able to understand it. Unix is updated so often, it must be maintainable.

I have never really invested much time into learning Unix or giving it much time as my OS, but now that I have been using it for a few days, I am starting to like the speed and fluidity of it. It will be hard getting used to not having some of the functionality that Windows has, but I like the fact that I can easily search for a program that I don't already have and download and install it with one button. We will see how it goes as time goes on...

...But for now, I'm hungry, time for dinner!
Posted in Uncategorized

Command School

Today I had a crash course in many commands used for Linux. During class, and during the discussion, I noticed a good amount of similarities between commands, even ones that didnt have anything to do with each other. There were a few categories that the commands fit into:

  1. Commands that read/write a file and file attributes
  2. Commands that undo the file attribute changes
  3. Commands that change system settings
  4. Commands that undo system settings
  5. Help
It seems as though all basic commands fit somewhere in this list. There are many variations of most commands, though.

Between the commands themselves, some similarities that I noticed are that they all are a command and then a user defined variable that dictates what to do the command on. This usually means that something is going to be read or changed. Sometimes there are variables like -a to do something to "all".

These similar traits relate to the Basics of the Unix Philosophy because they provide a way to see and change many attributes and files, and even allow you to create your own programs. This shows that Unix really is "free", as nothing is really hidden in some way.

During the first class, the class was asked to write what we think good code is and what a good program is. Here are the word clouds from the responses:

I think that it is interesting to see how the most used words kind of describe what Unix is all about: freedom. Most words come from the fact that Unix is so open. This way, there are thousands of "developers" who all have the opportunity to catch bugs, and give patch suggestions to make the next version better, increasing the intuitiveness of the OS and fixing bugs. This will also increase the efficiency of the system since so many people can have an input.

As seen by the success of such an operating system, it is pretty safe to say that the source code is easy to read, as so many people have worked on it, and having worked on it they must be able to understand it. Unix is updated so often, it must be maintainable.

I have never really invested much time into learning Unix or giving it much time as my OS, but now that I have been using it for a few days, I am starting to like the speed and fluidity of it. It will be hard getting used to not having some of the functionality that Windows has, but I like the fact that I can easily search for a program that I don't already have and download and install it with one button. We will see how it goes as time goes on...

...But for now, I'm hungry, time for dinner!
Posted in Uncategorized