All posts by meganimals17

Comment on Part Wild by meganimals17

I too felt frustrated with Terrill constantly putting off buying the proper equipment for Inyo. In many ways, she tried to dedicate a lot of her time to Inyo, and she exhibited much more patience than I ever could. For example, she made sure to research and find the best food possible and also took Inyo on long outdoor adventures.

However, she gradually begin listening less and less to Lena, the wolf-dog breeder’s, advice, and starting acting with her heart instead of her mind. Furthermore, trying to keep a wolf-dog, or any dog for that matter, confined in modest town home with next to no yard is simply inhumane and unnatural for such an energetic animal. She even left Inyo unattended on many instances, even at college, which could put many in danger.

Terill also tends to neglect her intuition in her personal life. Though her new husband seems like a nice guy, and they seem to function well together, she ignores her instinct to wait a year to get married, and she seems to see her husband as a project rather than a partner when he gets himself into thousands of debt.

Comment on Novelty- the agent behind our desire to be different by meganimals17

Your ending questing may have been hypothetical, but I believe YES. I know we have argued whether we as humans “mess with nature,” or if we are simply part of nature and create only inevitable consequences, and I feel in this instance that trying to turn a wolf, hybrid or not, into a household pet is wrong and selfish. As unfair as it may sound, some animals seem to simply survive better with the assistance of humans, but it seems like we hold wolves back, and for what purpose? to have an exotic pet? We have enough dog breeds that there is no excuse for trying to transform a vicious hunter into a lap dog.

Comment on Snakes, Eagles, and Foxes, oh my by meganimals17

“Dynamic” could not describe this reading better. I agree that he should have gone more into depth on the opposition to Isbell’s theories, which is why I felt so curious about other findings on the matter. Though I really enjoyed his “storytelling,” for it helped show the link between historical domestication and the modern world, I can see how some of his stories seemed ambiguous and distracting to the scientific claims in the novel.

Comment on Monkey see, monkey do by meganimals17

You’re right that he found a few inconsistencies with that particular theory, but he did not go very in depth with it, which is what prompted me to further research it. His main issue to me, seemed to be with the notion that a species (of plant or animal) could impact a separate species’ ability to see color at all (page 175). When I mentioned his “theories” in my post, I should have clarified that these were simply others’ theories he brought up in his novel, not necessarily ones he held true. He seemed to struggle with any of the theories for the reasoning behind their ability to see color, and he did not make many absolute statements on the matter, but the article I attached gave a little more background on that area of research.

Comment on Bulliet’s Hamburgers: Still Tough to Chew by meganimals17

Your second paragraph voices inquires I’ve had since I was little. I think it’s so bizarre that people one day discovered they can drink milk from other animals or even make food and clothing out of them at all. I have religious beliefs that offer their own support for why people began eating animals, but I hoped to get more of an insight specifically just how humans discovered the multitude of uses for animals.

Bulliet seems to think it was by accident that cats became domestic after humans used the friendlier ones to ward of mice, and he may be right, but I personally would like to know how people exterminated them before, and how they figured out that cats make excellent mice hunters. Furthermore, how did they get a lynx into their storage shed without being attacked? Bulliet mentioned lower adrenal levels, and basically calmer lynx (or whatever he believes to be the precursor to the cute tabby cats), but his book did not give me the in-depth answers I seek.

Comment on Bulliet’s Hamburgers: Still Tough to Chew by meganimals17

Your second paragraph voices inquires I’ve had since I was little. I think it’s so bizarre that people one day discovered they can drink milk from other animals or even make food and clothing out of them at all. I have religious beliefs that offer their own support for why people began eating animals, but I hoped to get more of an insight specifically just how humans discovered the multitude of uses for animals.

Bulliet seems to think it was by accident that cats became domestic after humans used the friendlier ones to ward of mice, and he may be right, but I personally would like to know how people exterminated them before, and how they figured out that cats make excellent mice hunters. Furthermore, how did they get a lynx into their storage shed without being attacked? Bulliet mentioned lower adrenal levels, and basically calmer lynx (or whatever he believes to be the precursor to the cute tabby cats), but his book did not give me the in-depth answers I seek.

Comment on Theories of Domestication- Bulliet vs. Ingold by meganimals17

Okay thank you for letting me know, and I will make sure to break up my posts better.

I see your point that just because he does not load his novel with citations does not make it inaccurate; however, if he is trying to target a broad audience, he needs to focus less on reducing the formality and more on making it an “easy read.” It is interesting and thought-provoking, but it contains complex theories with little support, and it tends to drag on with parallel paragraph structure (for example on page 85 where his claims are set up using the exact same structure).

One would think the parallel structure would make his ideas easier to follow, but I thought his description on genes on page 82 would be extremely different for the average adult, who has not had a biology lesson since high school, to comprehend.

I cannot find out who he was trying to target with this book, but it absolutely is not underage adolescents, based on the content of the first chapter.

Comment on Theories of Domestication- Bulliet vs. Ingold by meganimals17

I had always learned that the first domestication of cats occurred in Egypt because the Egyptians worshipped the half-cat goddess Bastet. The Egyptians admired the cat as a species for its sense of mystery and it’s intellect and piercing eyes, which the Europeans actually found to represent evil. However, recent studies have shown in tombs an entirely different species of cat that could not be native to Egypt.
This does not disprove Bulliet’s idea at all. As a matter of fact, further research on the domestication of cats in Egypt supports some of his claims.

That being said, I do not think his proposal is completely inaccurate, I just feel he has a bad habit of overgeneralizing domestication to one or a few small occurrences, and I believe the Egyptians purposefully domesticated cats for worship and to control mice.
I see how Bulliet finds the long-term domestication accidental, but I believe that the Egyptians intended the cats to “stick around” for dynasties because why else would they mummify and/or worship them from one century to the next? This is only my own personal opinion.