The Nature of Discomfort

The majority of Humans trend towards comfort.  This makes sense.  We build houses so we don’t have to sleep outside in a rainstorm.  Many houses are elaborate but at their base level their purpose is to provide shelter, one of Maslow’s basic needs.  A shelter is something that offers protection from the elements, a dry and warm place to sleep at night.   It should be a place to recover from the day’s adventures, a place to relax, a place to be comfortable.  These additional functions of a shelter are dependent on having something to recover from.  A mildly uncomfortable experience of my own is included below in an attempt to visualize the importance of exposing yourself to discomfort on a regular basis.   DSC_0218

It is the view from the top of the mountain that is remembered, not the strenuous climb to reach it.  Yet without the struggle you can never experience the view.  If we forget to leave the comfort of our shelters we will forget the reasons the struggle is worth it.  We will forget what the view from the peak looks like.  We might become content with a picture in a magazine or on a screen.  We might miss out on the chance to uncover a new perspective.  Our homes are comfortable places and they should be, but without something uncomfortable to recover from their function may become irrelevant.

Perhaps our educational systems should be a series of uncomfortable experiences that build on one another in an attempt to uncover new perspectives for the pupil.  Perhaps the system should be something that lets you acclimate at your own pace yet encourages embracing the uncomfortable experiences in an effort to grow the mind and the body.  To build a muscle you must tear some of the fibers on a molecular level.  If the tear was of the right magnitude the fibers heal stronger.  If it was too great it might cause permanent damage.  The trick is finding the right level of stress to expose to the muscle in order to achieve maximum growth.  Do our minds operate in a similar way?

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