Ibukun D. Alegbeleye is a Ph.D. Candidate and Graduate Teaching Scholar in the Department of Agricultural, Leadership, and Community Education at Virginia Tech, USA, where he currently teaches an undergraduate course titled, “The Dynamics of Leadership.” Ibukun holds a Master of Science degree in Agribusiness Management from Tennessee State University (2016). His research focusses on the linkage between leadership and followership, particularly the influence of followership on leadership behaviors and outcomes.

Ibukun D. Alegbeleye is a Ph.D. Candidate and Graduate Teaching Scholar in the Department of Agricultural, Leadership, and Community Education at Virginia Tech, USA, where he currently teaches an undergraduate course titled, “The Dynamics of Leadership.” Ibukun holds a Master of Science degree in Agribusiness Management from Tennessee State University (2016). His research focusses on the linkage between leadership and followership, particularly the influence of followership on leadership behaviors and outcomes.

Open Pedagogy: Freedom in the Classroom

I really like the topic this week about open critical pedagogy. A quick confession: at the beginning of this course, having previewed the blogging opportunities that lie ahead in the course, I had planned to blog on this topic – I should have a lot to write about open pedagogy, I thought to myself ;)…Well, fast forward to this week, I realized I didn’t know as much as I thought I knew about open pedagogy. I had thought open pedagogy was all about open educational resources; alas! it was more than that. I have learned from the readings this week that open educational resources (e.g., open access, open science) is just a subset of open education, however, when people think about open education, they think more about open educational resources and less about open pedagogy.

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Inclusive Pedagogy: Noticing the Subtle Differences in the Classroom

For me, the article on inclusive pedagogy resonated the most with me. As recent as last year, when I hear of inclusiveness in the classroom, I think primarily of race and gender. However, sometimes last year (I think April, 2018), I attended a Networked Learning Initiatives (NLI) on differentiation in the classroom that changed my perspective on differences in the classroom. This was an interesting 2-hour session that was worth every second. I learned many things and I will share some of them in the paragraphs that follow.

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Alternatives to Grading: New wine in Old Bottles?

Critics of grading have offered arguments (some compelling, and others not so compelling) to discredit the system of grading that we have grown accustomed to. While some have advocated for a complete overhaul of the grading system, others have been less daring in their recommendations, and have only recommended we do away with letter grades. Common to all, however, is the sentiment that grading is fraught with problems that need addressing.

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Networked Learning – transcending physical contact

Gone are the days when one’s network is limited to the people in one’s life – neighbors, classmate, colleagues at work etc – these days, the term ‘network’ transcends physical contact. The advent of the internet brought along social media and its platforms. Chief among social media platforms is Twitter. Twitter has become such a powerful information dissemination platform that the President of the United States (Donald Trump) frequently shares information of national importance on it. And if anyone was ever doubting the capability of these social media platforms, I’m sure they would have been convinced by now.

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Differentiation in the Classroom: Reflections

On Wednesday, 18th April 2018, I attended the Networked Learning Initiatives (NLI) on differentiation in the classroom. This was an interesting 2-hour class that was worth every second. The facilitators made this class interesting by making us discuss in groups and giving us problems to solve in groups. I learned many things and I will share some of them in the paragraphs that follow.

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The Future of the University

The university community has undergone monumental changes over the years. These changes have ranged from structural to administrative changes. The interesting thing about these changes is that they have been gradual, albeit steady. They were almost imperceptible while they occurred, and today we almost ask ourselves, “how did we get here?”. However, we ought not to be taken aback as these changes are reflective of the changes in the larger society. We probably just have not been paying close attention. So as I reflect about the future of the university, I thought maybe we could learn a thing or two about how past and current trends in the society have impacted the University of today and use such trends to predict the University of the future. Therefore, in this blog post, I will be discussing the future of the university based on past and current trends in the society. Continue reading The Future of the University

Why followership is as important as leadership

For too long, leadership studies have been leader-centered. Early literatures on leadership have focussed on the traits, behaviors, and abilities of the leader to motivate and influence followers. Followers have always been considered as the recipient of leadership rather than as co-constructors. Consequently, many funding organizations have invested millions in research dollars to study leadership – the leadership industry is now $50 million. It is also common practice for business organizations to send their employees to leadership programs to develop their leadership skills in the hope that such persons would be more productive after attending such programs. However, these leadership programs have not yielded the desired outcome. One possible reason for this might be because an important variable in the leadership equation has been ignored for far too long – this variable is followership. Continue reading Why followership is as important as leadership

Social Media in Higher Ed!

This is the age of social media, and social media is here to stay; it seems as though no campaign against it would work. Even a recent campaign to quit Facebook due to a reported data breach proved futile. While this blog post is not about the Facebook data breach, it presents a good example of the challenges of social media. Despite these challenges, it appears as though social media is now a big part of people’s lives, and people can hardly do without it. I would like to use this blog post to reflect on the use of social media in higher education.

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Open Access journals in the field of Agricultural Education

Being a Ph.D. student in the Department of Agricultural, Leadership, and Community Education, I was curious to see if there were open access journals in the field of agricultural education. After spending some time surfing the web, I came across a couple of open access journals. One of them is the: “The Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension: Competence for Rural Innovation and Transformation.”  Continue reading Open Access journals in the field of Agricultural Education

Brainstorming on Guns: How effective has it been?

The other day I was watching President Trump having a brainstorming session with those affected by the Florida shooting. Now, if you are remotely connected to the United States, in any shape or form, then you would most likely be aware of the Florida shooting. The “gun debate” has been ongoing in mainstream media and even social media for some time now. However, it has intensified in the past month as a result of the unfortunate shooting that took place at Marjory Stoneman high school in Parkland, Florida on the 14th of February, 2018. Following that incident, the president invited those that were affected by the shooting to the white house (such as students, parents, teachers, and school administrators) for a brainstorming session on the way forward. While it might be considered as a good move by the president, at least politically, however, knowing what I now know about brainstorming in teams, I would think it was a bad move.

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