Comment on From Death Comes New Life by rlaj360

Considering the reputation that the Soviet Union garnered for being such a strict regime, it is not all that surprising to see that they first started to use these forceful tactics very early on. This set the tone for basically the entire length the government was in power. They really left themselves no other choice though by over promising and under achieving. Rather than admit that they were unfit for rule and had been too ambitious they turned to whatever means necessary to retain their fragile hold on the country.

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Comment on The Muslim East and the Soviet Conquest by hgiannoni

This post, along with Sam’s post, go to show that not everyone was on board with the kind of social and economic change that the Bolsheviks were pushing for. While they may not have wanted to live under the monarchy, they were reluctant to trade one dictator with another. The Muslims were not alone in their rejection of the Soviets, though they along with all the other quasi-rebellions were quickly silenced and crushed by the Soviets to prevent the dissent from spreading. Yea this was pretty sweet.

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Comment on Confiscation of Church Authority by rlaj360

It is sad to see that Bolsheviks used a religion as a scapegoat, rather than as something that should be a comfort to the masses. Instead of admitting they were at fault, they like so many other governments past and present simply looked for the easy way out. The church and the Bolsheviks really could have worked together to create a more harmonious and egalitarian society had they only cooperated with one another. This is not to say it would have fixed communism in Russia, but it could have helped.

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Comment on Uprisings are Traditions in Russia by hgiannoni

mwill7 does bring up a good point. As was mentioned in this post, as soon as the Bolsheviks realized what was going on at the island, a media blackout was implemented and the rebellion silenced as quickly as possible. How many other ‘small’ and ‘innocuous’ rebellions were there in the greater Russian state? Its almost a certainty there were many more that even today we do not know about and from that it can be inferred that while many people may not have been loyalists against the Bolsheviks, they were also fed up of living under a monarchy as well.

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Comment on Komsomol: The Communist Youth by Hannah Martin

I love this post. I truly had no idea about the Komsomol and their role in the communists’ goals. I think the Party leaders hit the nail right on the head when they identified this group of “youths” as an important piece of the puzzle. I think that the age group that made up the Komsomol wielded a lot more influence than some people assumed. The standards to which the Party held the Komsomol also seem characteristically strict, so it’s nice to see that there is some continuity during this period.

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Comment on Silent Cinema: The Eisenstein Behind It by Hannah Martin

I really enjoyed your choice of topic for this week’s post! Having taken Dr. Nelson’s course on the history of Russian culture, Eisenstein’s film Battleship Potemkin was one of the most interesting pieces of culture that we studied. I think it’s important that the Bolshevik’s used the medium of visual arts, like film, to get their point across because it’s universally understood (even in 21st century America!) and powerful across all kinds of cultural boundaries.

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Comment on Youth of Russia by court18

I really enjoy this post because I think it shows a critical tactic that the Bolsheviks used to transition from a revolutionary party to a ruling one. By inculcating the Russian youth with ideals that aligned with the ideology of the party, the Bolsheviks were able to establish a solid base of support; this was critical in a time where the Bolsheviks strived to stay on top and hold onto power amongst mass public discontentment. Something that I feel goes along with the problem at the time of how to deal with the youth in Russia is that of the Homeless Children. On the Seventeen Moments site, it discusses the large amount of destitute youth found in the country during the revolutionary period. I wonder if the Bolsheviks took the same approach toward this category of youth.

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Comment on Youth of Russia by joeconnorwilly

This a great post and I really like the images that you chose. The Komsomol, like the American Boy Scouts, seems like a good way for the youth to become indoctrinated into the culture of the country. How did the the Komsomols effect Soviet history later in the century? Did they grow up and carry on the Revolution? Was Putin in the Komsomol?

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Comment on Uprisings are Traditions in Russia by Eric Schneider

It is interesting and so true for it seems like every month or so their is some type of revolt or revolution that needs to be dealt with. There are so many different factions in Russia each with their own agenda and what they want in exchange for their support. But with every major revolution and change of government their will be a division and breaking off from the main faction, its a natural reaction.

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Comment on The Sword and Shield by joeconnorwilly

This is really an interesting post. It goes into great depth about the different factions that emerged within Russia after the October Revolution. The transition from revolutionary politics to oppressive police force seems a very extreme way to deal with those that opposed the revolution. I really like the amount of sources you used and the varied views that they give.

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