the fake phone

In studio, we mostly study physical products and how they sculpt to the shape of a hand. As we journey into the range of motions of our hands and how they interact with products, I find it interesting that even digitally-based products still consider the hand. For example, most touch screen applications implement one or a few of these motions: pinch, scroll, swipe, press. And interactive UI only encourages this habit further.

Klemens Schillinger’s Substitute Phone is designed to overcome smartphone addiction

Klemens Schillinger created a phone-like replica, using the simple rectangle with soft radii we are familiar with. He then incorporates a series of rolling balls that follow a path and encourage the same motions an app would. The plastic the balls are encased in is actually pretty dense, replicating the weight and heft of an iPhone. This product is supposed to substitute a smartphone and almost relax the user, without the mental addiction of notifications.

Klemens Schillinger’s Substitute Phone is designed to overcome smartphone addiction

With this physical stimulation, it is supposed to help users cope with “withdrawal symptoms”, often in their attempts to minimize phone/social media use. There are many studies that say time alone with your thoughts actually makes you more creative, but often we fill that empty space with a quick Twitter or Snapchat check. Is this the right direction our products should be going in? Do you believe this user group will only continue to grow?

You can read more about it here.