Desktop Environment – Cinnamon

I have been testing out different Desktop Environment throughout the semester. Of all of the ones that I tried out, I seem to always go back to using Cinnamon. Cinnamon has a very simple interface that combines the usefulness of Unity and Simplicity of GNOME 2. Cinnamon was created to maintain the classic GNOME 2 look as well as be adaptable to the new features coming GNOME 3 and Unity interfaces.

Cinnamon was originally created for a different distro called Mint Linux. However, since Mint is based off of Ubuntu, porting the desktop environment to the Ubuntu wasn’t too difficult.

I think this desktop environment is the best way to introduce Linux to a new user because of its similarities to Windows XP/Windows 7. Some similarities like the task bar at the bottom of the screen helps new user break out of their comfort zones slowly.

I highly recommend anyone to give Cinnamon a shot. Just go to their website and follow the instructions to install.

 

 

Desktop Environments – GNOME

Ever since I installed Ubuntu 12.04 LTS for Intro to Unix and Applied Software, I have been trying to find alternatives to the default Desktop Environment, Unity. I gave Unity a chance for the first few weeks on installing the OS, but it felt like an awkward combination of Mac OSX and Linux fundamentals. Then I began researching for new desktop environments. While researching, I found into GNOME Desktop Environment. After I installed it from the Ubuntu Software Center, I logged out and went to select the GNOME interface. The selection menu, there were multiple options. GNOME Classic, GNOME, Ubuntu, Ubuntu 2D.

GNOME Classic is basically GNOME 3.0 with a the classic GNOME 2.0 interface. This was created for people who couldn’t adapt to the new interface.

 

GNOME 3.0 is the latest version of the desktop environment. It is similar to Unity in many ways, but the biggest difference is the way the GNOME 3.0 interface looks.Surprisingly, I found out that Ubuntu Unity was forked from the GNOME 3.0. Unlike Unity, many of the setting and apps are hidden away until you hit a hot corner on the left to reveal all of the running apps,app tray, and additional virtual desktop.

Overall, I found GNOME 3.0 to be a little annoying when it came to be productive because the desktop screens where set up on top to bottom, and in order to open any app it required going to the app tray. I’ll try to stick with it a little bit longer and see if I can look past these annoyances.

If anyone is interested check out the GNOME website: http://www.gnome.org/gnome-3/

Unix Blog Post #2 – Issues :(

Today, I had to switch a virtual machine to run Ubuntu because my Ubuntu install on my hard drive was over heating my laptop. My laptop would constantly run the fan, whether or not, I am doing anything intensive. Initially, I thought it was a video card issue, since I have both an Intel and ATI Radeon graphics cards in my laptop. So I installed the required drivers, which allowed me to turn of the ATI Radeon Graphics card. Unfortunately, my fan continued to exhaust heat from the fans.I am going to take my laptop tomorrow to LUUG. Hopefully, they can figure out what is going. If anyone else can help me, my laptop model is HP Pavilion DV6.

Despite, the driver issues, I am enjoying using Ubuntu. Many of the different commands that I am learning from this class and ECE 3574 are finally starting to sink in. Typing commands into the Ubuntu’s terminal is starting to become more natural. Hopefully, by the end of this class, I will remember most of these commands.