Districts: A way to move through space

Districts are a method of organizing a larger area into smaller, more manageable pieces. For example, you might live in Hamptons Roads, which is made up of Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Suffolk, Chesapeake, Portsmouth, and Virginia Beach. But this is too large. The District is more about a smaller scale, i.e. the neighborhhod.

So, in this instance, the whole area could simply be the space between the road and your home. Some call this a lawn, but humor me.

Let’s start in the middle of the road. If you look carefully, the road slopes down to the side of the pavement to a typical concrete curb. Be careful not to trip! Then there is a small strip of grass before the sidewalk. This space is what I call a forgotten zone by the city. Technically, the city is charged with ownership and maintanence of this little strip of forgotten soil. In reality you end up mowing it too.

The sidewalk separates two responsibilities, the city and the individual [which can also be seen as two types of districts if you keep the definition loose]. After the sidewalk is the lawn. Do what you will with it, but this is your castle’s domain. That is, of course, if you live in a place that has grass and not zero-scape.

Next is the porch. Typically there is some sort of path to the steps that leads up to the entrance to the home. Why? because elevation means safety [unless you are falling without a parachute]. Every step up into the porch, however small, changes the viewpoint of your journey. Stop and look around instead or looking down at the steps. For your safety do not do this at the same time.

Finally you take out you key and open the door. For a brief moment both public and private a linked through the open door, and then it ends when it is shut again. The path from the road to the home is sometimes long, sometimes short, but every path is different. Find your districts and really look at them, otherwise everything is just the same.

[HRCNBD]

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