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McCellan- The Industrial Revolution by David Barney

The industrial revolution that occurred in the eighteenth century had caused considerable changes to society like that of the Neolithic Revolution that occurred over 12,000 years ago where humans adopted food production. The onset of the industrial revolution had some unlikely origins as progress grew out of necessity rather than abundance. In England, the use …

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The Groma by David Barney

Roman empire commonly used the Groma as a device to survey land for development. The origin of the device predates the Roman empire. Roman architect Vitruvius described the Groma as coming from the ancients. The device served many needs for military, agricultural, and civic needs. The Groma assisted the military in the construction of fortifications. …

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Comment on The Story of the National Road by davidbarney

Interesting article! Being from Maryland I find it really cool that I don’t have to go very far to visit this historic road. I’ve been to Cumberland before and I would not expect it to be the origin of such an important road. I noticed that you mention that a lot of small towns were created along the road. Why is there a lack of major cities on the road? I read the first article provided and saw that while newer interstates roads had bypassed the road, it seemed that railroads had already ended the excitement for the road.

The Groma by David Barney

Roman empire commonly used the Groma as a device to survey land for development. The origin of the device predates the Roman empire. Roman architect Vitruvius described the Groma as coming from the ancients. The device served many needs for military, agricultural, and civic needs. The Groma assisted the military in the construction of fortifications.…

Comment on Boorstin – Getting There First by davidbarney

I love the Ricky Bobby quote! It’s interesting how both steamboats and locomotives ended up both using steam power but locomotives were ultimately the faster mode of transportation. I also liked that you mentioned the difference between American and British locomotives where the Americans built for the present while the British built for the future. I read the article and saw that gravity railways were used before steam locomotives were used. I never knew that those actually existed and I looked more into it. Turns out railways would just be sloped in order to transport things from one place to another. I can see how having a steam locomotive would be much more beneficial as now these railways can operate in more than one direction.

Tarkov- Engineering the Erie Canal by David Barney

Towards the beginning of the 19th century, the United States had demand for the construction of public works but a lack of domestic engineers to carry out these tasks. Often engineers from Europe had to come to the United States in order to construct public works, such as canals. The construction of the Erie canal …

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Medieval Uses of Air: Lynn White, Jr. By David Barney

Prior to the 19th century, technology and science for the most part was independent of each other. This implied that scientific understanding did not always, and often did not, precede related technological developments. This was true for technology that put air to work. Medieval technology that utilized air was often simple enough to not require …

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Geselowitz: Classical Greeks by David Barney

Ancient Greece experienced an interval of technological and theoretical growth in the “Classical Period.” During this time, Greece was made up of several independent city-states that competed for trading and fought wars. Competition between city-states as well as Phoenician influence had allowed for technology to flourish in Greece. The Greeks had several influences that they …

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