10 Education Lessons the U.S. Can Learn From Other Countries

In my opinion, it would be inappropriate to conduct any large scale change in higher education without analyzing and changing K-12. We have all heard stories how the U.S. is falling behind in worldwide K-12 ranking. The following gallery presents some positive lessons from countries around the world that should be taken into consideration. Personally, I liked the early foreign language education from South Korea and more preparation time from Finland.

http://www.takepart.com/photos/america-gets-schooled-top-10-lessons-us-learn-other-countries

 

 

Diversity – check!

I would like to recommend a documentary to watch. The documentary is called “Indoctrinate U” and it touching upon the theme of diversity in the modern university. The documentary pointed out several interesting points. However, I am going to skip presenting those points, since I would like that everyone concludes their own. Hopefully, we can discuss this in some of our classes. I know that video is an hour and a half long, but stick through it, because this topic is quite important for us a future educators and university administrators.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHyvRHrYYBA

The spirit of openness

I have recently read the following post from a MIT graduate.

http://tech.mit.edu/V132/N35/loveletter.html 

It is interesting how this person describes his personal experience in two top ranked universities – Harvard and MIT. The contrast presented in the author’s post is primarily directed to the spirit of openness and collaboration that MIT has, compared to Harvard. In my previous reflections, before even reading this post, I always had an impression that the greatest universities are those places filled with open-minded people willing to exchange ideas and collaborate. This thought of mine came from the impression that collaboration of two great minds is never 1 + 1 = 2 but it is 1 + 1 = 2 + some delta.