Comment on No More Opium for the People by jrc554

Its amazing that even though Khrushchev introduced a “thaw”, where censorship was decreases, yet at the same time, he called for the reduction of the Orthodox Church, which as you said, played a huge role in Russian lives. It seems that he uncensored things that wouldn’t rival or affect his power, such as freeing Gulag prisoners, and instead, limited religion which could wield threatening power to his legitimacy if it were to see differently then him.

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Comment on Moral Code of the Builder of Communism by bfulcer

I think my favorite of the 12 tenets is number two: Conscientious labor for the good of society: he who does not work shall not eat. I don’t say it’s my favorite because I think it’s a reasonable or fair principle, it’s obviously a pretty draconian measure. However, I do find it funny in the sense that one of the main criticisms you frequently hear about communism and socialism is that people can just leech of off others without doing any work or by doing less work.

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Comment on No More Opium for the People by bfulcer

It’s interesting to me that the government chose to “merge” the monasteries in Russia rather than to flat out say they were closing them down. Ultimately it seems like that’s what they were actually doing (closing them down) but I’m still a little puzzled as to why they felt the need to hide that fact as I don’t think many people were fooled by intentions of the anti-religion campaign. Good post I really liked the title.

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Comment on The Turning Point:1968 by jackscher

Very interesting post. I posted on 1968 also (and the Prague Spring) but I did not mention how big of a public relations disaster this event was for the Soviet Union, which is very important. Its important to note that many retrospectively see this event as the moment that really marked the beginning of the end of the Soviet Union. The spirit of rebellion continued after the period of normalization.

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Comment on Hero of the Final Frontier by jackscher

Very interesting post! It is true; I was told Armstrong’s name multiple times, but cannot recall ever hearing of Gagarin. I wrote a post on how heroic people like him became for achievements that brought glory to the Soviet Union, and this is an obvious portrayal of that. Mine however, focused more on airplane pilots. Adventure into space is a different level of heroism. Nice work!

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Comment on Corn is Key by amy925

Similar to what everyone has commented prior, I really liked the picture that you chose to go along with your blogpost. This is an interesting topic because the Soviets spent so much effort on growing corn that they neglected other aspects of agriculture. The tidbits about corn beer and corn borsch are also pretty hilarious. Great job on this post!

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Comment on Anti-thaw by A. Nelson

I don’t know where to start listing all the things that excite me about this post. The choice of images and texts is excellent. Your tone (a bit snarky!) is perfectly suited to the subject matter, and you do a terrific job of directing your reader in various ways – toward the best “nuggets” (if they are really rushed), toward the real gems (Khrushchev’s speech – if they appreciate a good tip), and toward some of Voznesenky’s most accessible and memorable poems. Awesome!

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