Comment on Emir of Bukhara by Timur Djan

May name is Seyyid Mir Timur Djan Khan, I’m the only living male Descendant of the last Emir of Bukhara. The other Persons traces back to female members .

We Members of the Manghit Dynasty lives since 1920 in different Countriy’s like USA, Turkey and Germany.
Since 1920 until today it is not allowed of any Person from the Family to visit Usbekistan.
Sencereliy: Timur Djan…

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Comment on The Failed Coup by wilkins

One may have thought that since there were many people who pushed for more freedoms and a more workable economy, there would be more support for Gorbachev. A nicely summarised blog, great detail, I felt that I learnt from it.

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Comment on Political Lessons From Chernobyl by jessrs217

I also did a post on the Chernobyl accident. I liked the point that you made about relating the accident to the concept of glasnost. It was a great opportunity for openness and for other countries to help out. When reading about it for my post, I found that while grateful for the international aid, it also made people slightly distrustful of the government, questioning why it was unable to take care of its own people.

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Comment on The Final Strike by jessrs217

I thought that this post was really interesting. I especially liked in the beginning where you pointed out that most people would not have guessed that the end of the Soviet Union would have come from the inside, but instead would have expected it to come from something like an outside intervention. Its really odd to think that this regime was taken out by a coup that involved much less violence than one would have expected.

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Comment on Taboos Abound by jessrs217

This was a really good post. This topic was one that I didn’t realize was so prevalent in Soviet culture. I did not know that they had so many people who fell into this “certain category of women” at that time. I think it really shows that traditional Soviet culture was not ready to accept or talk about this aspect of society.

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Comment on Taboos Abound by jessrs217

This was a really good post. This topic was one that I didn’t realize was so prevalent in Soviet culture. I did not know that they had so many people who fell into this “certain category of women” at that time. I think it really shows that traditional Soviet culture was not ready to accept or talk about this aspect of society.

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Comment on From Vodka to Water by jessrs217

I liked this post, I thought that it was really interesting. I especially liked the statistic you gave that the campaign caused alcohol consumption to drop by fifty percent, but then matched it with the fact that there was also a sharp increase in moonshine production and organized crime. I think its a good contradiction that shows that these kinds of anti-alcohol or prohibition campaigns don’t actually do any good. While they may cause a drop in legal drinking, it is always followed by an increase in illegal activity that is just as bad, if not worse for the country than what they were trying to get rid of in the first place.

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Comment on Sobering Up by jessrs217

I feel like Gorbachev should have known what would happen with this kind of campaign, after seeing what happened in the United States with the Prohibition era, because the effects were basically the same. Both the anti-alcohol campaign and prohibition caused an increase in the creation of moonshine, an increase in organized crime and arrests, and a loss for the economy, among other things. I like how you called it a sobering experience for the Soviet Union, because in reality that’s exactly what it ended up being both for them and for the United States years earlier.

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