19 Comments

  1. Cory Ribley
    21 June, 2018 @ 1:26 pm

    this is all wrong

    Reply

  2. Nick Vivid Tourdates
    5 April, 2018 @ 9:46 pm

    Wow, incredible weblog format! How long have you ever been blogging for? you make running a blog look easy. The overall look of your site is fantastic, as neatly as the content material! musical artist nick vivid

    Reply

  3. Danuta
    4 February, 2018 @ 10:47 am

    ___123___Behind the Iron Curtain: Western Music and the Soviet Collapse – Pass the Vodka, Comrades___123___

    Reply

  4. Kailee
    30 January, 2018 @ 12:49 pm

    ___123___Behind the Iron Curtain: Western Music and the Soviet Collapse – Pass the Vodka, Comrades___123___

    Reply

  5. A New Chapter! 6 Proven Russian E-book Resources to Improve Your Russian | FluentU Russian
    10 January, 2018 @ 4:48 pm

    […] has a rich culture, and Russians are extremely proud of their authors and poets. Remember that Russian didn’t have access to most foreign influences until the demise of communism in the early 1990s, which is why all Russians are very well-versed in […]

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  6. Prabash
    8 January, 2018 @ 5:27 am

    Wow very Nice Article Sharing

    Reply

  7. Sztuka Wolności XII: Marsz ku Wolności » Obiektywizm.pl
    3 December, 2017 @ 12:34 pm

    […] Z ciekawostek historycznych – w wywiadzie dla Joe Rogan’a James Hetfield z Metallici wspominał swój koncert w Moskwie z 1991 roku, podczas upadania bloku wschodniego. Mówił, że po tym, jak zespół zagrał kilka utworów, milicjanci obstawiający widowisko zaczęli ściągać mundury i tańczyć razem z ponad milionowym tłumem: „Podziwialiśmy transformację zamkniętego społeczeństwa do wolności, tuż przed nami”. Podczas bankructwa materialnego i duchowego wschodniej kurtyny otworzyło się okno możliwości, które zaczęli wykorzystywać artyści z zachodu [#]. Pierwszym prawicowym artystą z zachodu, o jakim mi wiadomo, który zagrał większy koncert w Związku Radzieckim, był Yngwie J. Malmsteen, w Leningradzie w 1989 roku. Jednymi z pierwszych zachodnich artystów, którzy grali w ZSRR były zespoły hard rockowe i metalowe (Uriah Heep ’87, Scorpions ’88, Malmsteen ’89), a jednym z pierwszych zespołów, jaki zagrał trasę koncertową w bloku wschodnim (choć z wyłączeniem samego ZSRR), byli Iron Maiden w 1984. [#] […]

    Reply

  8. NicePHPScripts.com
    29 August, 2017 @ 2:47 pm

    Do you have twitter? Great stuff by the way…

    Reply

  9. Manushree
    29 August, 2017 @ 5:12 am

    This is an awesome blog. It helped me alot. Thanks for the information.

    Reply

  10. one cancels other
    27 June, 2017 @ 6:37 am

    Some genuinely great articles on this site, regards for contribution. “An alcoholic is someone you don’t like who drinks as much as you do.” by Dylan Thomas.

    Reply

  11. yahdi siradj
    4 January, 2017 @ 2:21 am

    mmm this information really helps all comrades, thanks

    Reply

  12. Charles Campion
    1 November, 2016 @ 4:53 am

    This article is actually a nice one it helps new the web visitors, who are wishing for blogging.|

    Reply

  13. Carlos Cea Ahumada
    18 May, 2016 @ 10:26 pm

    Uriah Heep was the first western rock band played in URSS 1987 with a lot of success.

    Reply

  14. ryandellinger
    10 December, 2014 @ 10:46 pm

    Curious that the Russians would blacklist entire bands instead of individual songs… Not all of AC/DC is violence and neofascism, and not all of Tina Turner’s songs are about sex. I wonder if this is still an attempt to control what people listen to but in a roundabout, indirect manner.

    Reply

  15. mikegancio
    10 December, 2014 @ 7:53 pm

    That picture of the banned rock groups is awesome. Banning Van Halen for “anti-Soviet propaganda” is just too good. It’s a problem when your government is intimidated by Van Halen.

    Reply

  16. Alex Apollonio
    10 December, 2014 @ 11:23 am

    Great coverage of a topic that is often overlooked. The list of forbidden music was particularly interesting. (Usually, I don’t think of Kiss as particularly nationalistic) In many historical cases, cultural influences have inspired more change than anything overtly political.

    Reply

  17. annapope
    8 December, 2014 @ 9:57 pm

    Very nice post, I really liked primary source image of the “blacklist”, and thanks for including the English translation!

    Reply

  18. rkw15
    8 December, 2014 @ 9:30 pm

    Great post on rock n’ roll in Russia. This is a great followup to the posts a couple of weeks ago about Rock n’ Roll in Russia in the 1960’s and 70’s.

    Reply

  19. Jimmy Jewett
    8 December, 2014 @ 9:14 pm

    I find it super fascinating when social trends foreshadow coming events, such as the fall of the Soviet Union. It seems that the exchange of ideas across cultures is the best way to keep citizens happy, something the Soviet Union began to realize during the 1980s.

    Reply

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