9 Comments

  1. yahdi siradj
    4 January, 2017 @ 2:21 am

    mmm this information really helps all comrades, thanks

    Reply

  2. Charles Campion
    1 November, 2016 @ 4:53 am

    This article is actually a nice one it helps new the web visitors, who are wishing for blogging.|

    Reply

  3. Carlos Cea Ahumada
    18 May, 2016 @ 10:26 pm

    Uriah Heep was the first western rock band played in URSS 1987 with a lot of success.

    Reply

  4. ryandellinger
    10 December, 2014 @ 10:46 pm

    Curious that the Russians would blacklist entire bands instead of individual songs… Not all of AC/DC is violence and neofascism, and not all of Tina Turner’s songs are about sex. I wonder if this is still an attempt to control what people listen to but in a roundabout, indirect manner.

    Reply

  5. mikegancio
    10 December, 2014 @ 7:53 pm

    That picture of the banned rock groups is awesome. Banning Van Halen for “anti-Soviet propaganda” is just too good. It’s a problem when your government is intimidated by Van Halen.

    Reply

  6. Alex Apollonio
    10 December, 2014 @ 11:23 am

    Great coverage of a topic that is often overlooked. The list of forbidden music was particularly interesting. (Usually, I don’t think of Kiss as particularly nationalistic) In many historical cases, cultural influences have inspired more change than anything overtly political.

    Reply

  7. annapope
    8 December, 2014 @ 9:57 pm

    Very nice post, I really liked primary source image of the “blacklist”, and thanks for including the English translation!

    Reply

  8. rkw15
    8 December, 2014 @ 9:30 pm

    Great post on rock n’ roll in Russia. This is a great followup to the posts a couple of weeks ago about Rock n’ Roll in Russia in the 1960’s and 70’s.

    Reply

  9. Jimmy Jewett
    8 December, 2014 @ 9:14 pm

    I find it super fascinating when social trends foreshadow coming events, such as the fall of the Soviet Union. It seems that the exchange of ideas across cultures is the best way to keep citizens happy, something the Soviet Union began to realize during the 1980s.

    Reply

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